HowGood is Your Amazon Cart? This Plug-in Can Help

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If you’re a human with access to the internet, chances are you shop on Amazon relatively regularly. The sheer volume of products available in one spot is too much for our convenience loving hearts to avoid and, despite my issues with their excessive packaging and, unfortunately, morals as a company, I find myself shopping from Amazon semi-regularly too.

Living in a very (very) rural area - yes, I live on a literal mountaintop - I don’t have easy access to places like Target, Wholefoods, Trader Joes, or other health stores within a two-ish hour drive. So when I need to order something quickly that I don’t have nearby, and when I can’t pack up three kids and head to Denver, Amazon is often the simplest choice.

But, being the online superstore that it is, the excessive amount of options can be overwhelming to me. It’s harder than browsing the aisles of a store since there’s almost every option and brand known to man and womankind at the click of a button. I’m used to being picky about what I buy for my family, but ever since I discovered HowGood, it’s made finding healthy products on Amazon much less of a hassle.

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HowGood recently launched a simple plugin for your computer. Once installed, it will give you instant advice about the “goodness” of a product you may be interested in. HowGood believes the path to sustainability lies in transparency, especially when it comes to our food and the products we use in and on our bodies. Since the FDA is notoriously lax when it comes to regulating skincare and often allows ingredients that are knowingly harmful for our bodies, it feels like the consumer can’t rely on “regulations” when it comes to staying healthy.

That’s where HowGood hopes to simplify things.

As a website, they’ve rated more than 1 million products with only 5% earning the highest rating. They’ve build a team of researchers, gathering data from more than 350+ sources, and are committed to telling the story behind our food and other products and hopefully, in time, changing the face of the industry. (Click here to see how they evaluate a product for safety and sustainability.)

Their app, and now their newly launched plugin for Google Chrome, gives consumers access to their research and info on the sustainability and healthiness of a product, both in stores and online. Their plugin currently works on Amazon for baby related products (think wipes, diapers, baby lotions, etc), and they'll soon be expanding to include cosmetics and hopefully even more.

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Although I admittedly try to limit my Amazon shopping, it’s so nice to have the plugin as a backup to check the safety of the things I’m ordering for Aria and my older girls. When things labeled as “natural” or even organic generally aren’t so natural, having a deeper look into the ingredients and even the undisclosed fragrances and other sneaky chemicals that make up our go-to products is helpful. When HowGood gives a product a bad rating, it will recommend other safer alternatives for you to check out easily, without having to dig through the depths of Amazon’s inventory.

You can download HowGood’s app on your iPhone or Android to take with you to the grocery store and you can add their Chrome plug-in to your browser to make your online shopping as toxin-free as possible.

Although I haven’t placed my order yet, these water wipes (I haven’t quite gotten to the level of feeling comfortable with zero-waste wipes yet), Vitamind D drop, toxin free sunscreen, and prenatal vitamins are all sitting in my cart with the help of the HowGood plug-in.

Do you shop on Amazon? Would this plug-in help set your mind at ease?


*This post was sponsored by HowGood to promote their new plug-in. Thank you for supporting the brands and organizations that make SL&Co. possible.*

A Birthing Center Birth || Aria Josephine

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One week ago exactly, from the time I’m typing these words, my midwife agreed to break my water. Five hours later, Aria Josephine slid (for lack of a less graphic word) into the world and made us all fall in love all over again. From that minute on, it’s been a whirlwind of snuggles, sleeplessness, staring, and trying my darn best to soak up every last bit of these early days with my third girl.

I don’t know if it’s because it’s my third pregnancy, but everything about this time around felt so natural — not easy or smooth all the time, mind you, but very, very natural. Knowing what to expect makes things scarier in ways, but it also provides such a peace of mind that allowed me to trust my body and my instincts in ways I never have before. And I think that trust, ultimately, is what made this birth such a beautiful experience.

I know I don’t usually share such intimate things on my blog, but for the sake of anyone who is as obsessed with reading birth stories as I am (it’s a weird mom thing…don’t ask…) or for any of you who are pregnant, considering a non-hospital birth, or are curious about our story, I wanted to share all the details of that night in all their birth-y glory. Read on at your own expense and be prepared for all of the details of an unfiltered birth experience.

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After two unmedicated hospital births, I knew I wanted to give birth at a birthing center if I ever got pregnant again. Evie and Mara’s births were beautiful, but I craved more freedom, less mandatory intervention, and the opportunity to make this labor as fast and unencumbered as possible.

I’ll include the same disclaimer here that I did when I shared Mara’s birth story — I fully believe that all births are “natural births” so I won’t use that terminology here, I also had relatively low-risk and smooth pregnancies each time, so I can’t say that I would have made the same decisions I did under different circumstances — but I also won’t shy away from sharing about why I chose to forego medication and trust my body, because I’m really damn proud of myself. And you should be too, no matter how or through what means you bring a human into the world.

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May 19-20

I was 39 weeks and 3 days and had been having regular but mild contractions for days. I knew it wasn’t labor, but each time I timed them and a new wave came I got excited hoping they’d increase slowly but surely. After days of it, I was getting really emotionally exhausted and just ready for baby to get here.

A spring snow storm was on the way (we’re talking over 20 inches of snow) and with contractions happening every 10 minutes apart for most of the day, I was convinced baby was coming soon and neither AJ or I wanted to be stuck in the mountains (where there isn’t a place to give birth except in emergencies) when I went into active labor. We decided to head to Denver, book our AirBnb early for the week, and if baby came that night, great, if not, we’d do everything we could to get here while we were there.

Baby did not come that night, in fact. She made us wait two more days (full of all-day prodromal labor). During those days we did all of the labor inducing things I could think of. I walked countless flights of stairs, had sex lots of times (tmi, I know, but I told you I’d spare none of the details, right?), hooked myself up to my breast pump, bounced on my birthing ball, and ate spicy food. The contractions were still steady, but too short and not progressing.

May 21

9:00 AM— After lots of research and ok-ing it with my midwife, I convinced myself the night before that if I didn’t go into labor on my own, I’d try castor oil first thing in the morning to see if that sped anything up.

I took less than half the recommended dose of 2 tablespoons at about 9 AM (shaken with orange juice to help it go down) and by about noon I had a bowel movement and ramped up contractions. I knew that was to be expected though, so AJ and I decided to go “mall walk” like a couple of 78 year olds to see if that helped.

Surprise, it did.

12:30 PM — The combination of walking and the effects of the castor oil had my contractions coming every six minutes or so and they were definitely increasing in intensity, but weren’t lasting more than 30-40 seconds. I felt like it could be early labor, but also didn’t want the contractions to stop out of nowhere like they had everyday before.

1:50 PM — I had an appointment with my midwife scheduled already, so I decided to track my contractions as well as I could and see what she thought I should do. When she saw me, the first thing she said was that my “eyes looked like I was in labor” and I updated her with where I was at. At that point I was dilated to 5 cm and my cervix was thinning but not completely thinned, I was encouraged that progress was happening and knew that these early contractions were helping get everything ready. She did a membrane sweep as well which can speed things up even more.

We both agreed that we should stay nearby, try to get contractions moving along, and see where things went. She called the midwife on duty to let her know I was there and in the meantime, I walked up and down the flights of stairs at the birthing center probably 20 times to keep the contractions coming and hopefully speed them up.

3:30 PM — We were settled in our birthing room and the midwife had me on a “routine” to help encourage early labor to move into active labor. I sat on a birthing ball and pumped for 10 minute increments and also took doses of herbal tinctures (blue/black cohosh and cotton root bark) intermittently according to her schedule. (Side note: don’t attempt these things without your midwife’s supervision or approval…there are mixed studies on the effectiveness of the herbs, but I trusted her and was ready to try just about anything short of pitocin to get things going). We did two rounds of this routine and although the contractions were still coming (she’d pause the pumping to listen to baby’s heart rate each time as well to make sure the “induction” wasn’t stressing baby), they weren’t progressing to an active labor status quite yet.

4:30 PM — We decided to get some dinner, walk around a bit more, and then come back to the birth center for another round of ball/pump/herbs and then she’d check me to see where I was at.

7:00 PM — By this point, I was dilated to 6 cm, but contractions were still relatively mild (I would definitely say they hurt, but weren’t at the point that I needed to make noise or stop moving through them). I was 75% effaced and baby’s head was extremely low (the midwife could touch it so easily with each check it almost shocked me that I wasn’t more uncomfortable).

8:00 PM — We decided to break my water. This seemed like a scary call to make because once your water breaks, there’s no turning back…but my midwife said that she felt comfortable with the decision because of how low baby’s head was, how dilated I was, and because of my history of uncomplicated labors post-water breaking. (See below for the reality of labor once your water breaks in all its adult-diaper-y goodness).

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From here on out, my timeline is really messy, because things kicked in quickly after breaking my water. Active labor came on fast and my midwife drew me a bath in the incredible birthing tub that I had literally been dreaming about my entire pregnancy.

I spent hours in the bathtub, rocking on my hands and knees through contractions, focusing on breathing deeply, distracting my thoughts, and feeling strong through each of them. It was late, and I was getting tired which made me nervous, but I was determined to keep my labor progressing as much as I could and not do anything that could slow it down.

10:00 PM - 11:00 PM — I tried getting out of the tub several times to walk around the room (as much as you can walk around once your water breaks and you’re moaning your way through contractions). I used a “sling” hung from the ceiling to support my weight and squatted down during contractions to encourage baby to move further down. At this point, the contractions were intense and, as much as I hoped it wouldn’t happen, I had very painful back labor with each and every one of them. I needed AJ to apply intense counter-pressure on my pelvis to counteract the burning in my back, and ultimately, I ended up back in the bathtub because it at least soothed the rest of my body during the contractions.

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May 22

12:00 AM — I had been feeling lots of pressure (I thought it was a true bowel movement at first) and after lots of trips to the toilet, knew I’d be pushing soon. Baby was sitting SO low that resisting the urge to push was intense.

I still had about a centimeter to dilate and my midwife said there was just a lip of my cervix left to go and that she thought she could slide it over enough to let me push. We tried several positions for this…for some reason, the tub didn’t feel comfortable to me, I was getting light headed, really tired, and the contractions were so intense that I felt like being on my hands and knees would help move baby down and let me push more easily.

I had several contractions on the bed, on my hands and knees with AJ bent over me by my head applying counter pressure to my back (which wasn’t even helping at this point — I kept telling him to push harder but he physically couldn’t push any harder than he was, which if you’ve seen the man, is impressive). The midwife was behind me, ready to coach me through pushing and I tried pushing a bit at a time and although it helped a little bit, I didn’t have the overwhelming urge to push like I was expecting.

The last hour was the most intense part of transition and I slowly moved from the bed to the tub and finally to a birth stool because I really felt like my body wanted me to be upright for the pushing phase. (I pushed reclined in a hospital bed for both of my other two and was pretty convinced after all of my research and reading during this pregnancy that this position is one of the most unhelpful for an unmedicated labor).

I won’t sugar coat it…this part was hard. Labor is WORK. Aside from the pain of the contractions, my body was physically exhausted and I gathered every last bit of energy I had left to get this baby here.

1:05 AM — Aria Josephine was born. On a birthing stool, which is strange because I didn’t even consider that option before going into labor, but once I needed to push, it felt so good to be able to sit down, be upright, and use the stool to help me pull up, bear down, and push. My midwife coached me though “controlled pushing” which is something most hospitals don’t encourage (I had an episiotomy both times before because of the rush to get the baby out). I pushed with each contraction in short bursts, holding her there until my midwife told me to push again. It took only a few minutes, and I touched her head with my fingers, and pushed her out, no tearing or episiotomy required.

From there, the midwives immediately handed her to me and we slowly walked our way (through the post-birth shakes and blood) onto the bed to rest and birth the placenta.

For more than an hour, Aria laid on my chest, bonding, nursing when she was ready, and allowing both of us to recover. The midwife and nurse took her vitals while she was on my chest and eventually, probably two or three hours later, did her apgar test while I took another bath to clean up and relax.

We bonded as the three of us in the bed for most of the night. The midwives made me a bowl of adaptogenic porridge (seriously the most glorious meal of my life) and I spent most of the night in awe of this little life that I worked so hard to bring into the world.

At 6 am the next morning we packed up and went back to our AirBnb (I was hesitant about the birthing center’s quick release time, but knew that as long as everything went smoothly, there wasn’t a reason for us to stay longer than that).

A week later, I’ve been so happily surprised with how much easier my recovery has been in comparison to my other births. I’m fairly positive it’s due to the fact that I didn’t tear (something that can usually be avoided except in emergencies or rare occasions), and because I didn’t treat this birth like a “medical event”, but rather like a continuation of my daily life.


This birth was by far my favorite experience of the three, not because it was “easier”, less painful, or less exhausting (it wasn’t), but because I made such a concerted effort during my pregnancy to trust my body, let go of fear of the unknown, and not think of labor as something to “get through” but rather a beautiful and important (albeit really difficult) part of my journey in becoming Aria’s mama.

If you’re pregnant and hoping to do things with as little intervention as possible, here’s a quick run down of things I did towards the end of my pregnancy and throughout labor to (maybe) shorten my labor and keep me going throughout it:

  • Spent lots of time on my birthing ball during my third trimester (helps move baby down in the pelvis and position them in an ideal position for birth).

  • Read lots of birth stories (seriously so helpful). My favorite books were Birthing From Within and Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth.

  • Ate 4-6 raw dates per day

  • Drank Red Raspberry Leaf tea (an entire box during the last few weeks — it’s so good!)

  • Walked everyday, and especially throughout the Braxton Hicks and prodromal labor contractions

  • Had sex at least once a day if I was up to it (semen helps soften the cervix and climaxing encourages contractions)

  • Breast simulation/pumping (only at term and I didn’t go overboard until I was in Denver and committed to getting the baby out. It was super effective at keeping contractions going).

  • Squat/lunged/skipped stairs to encourage proper positioning in the pelvis

  • Utilized deep breathing, envisioning the contractions as “waves” helping me open up, and practiced staying calm throughout contractions

  • Used a Tens Unit during transition (it didn’t take away any pain, but the electrical currents at least provided a different sensation for me to focus on)

  • Communicated with AJ the entire time

Welcome to the world, sweet girl, thank you for letting me be the one to get you here.

Conversations on Confidence & Raising Daughters

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One of the most common questions I’m asked as a mama of multiple girls is “are you going to try for a boy"? Well meaning strangers see AJ with his daughters and jokingly suggest that he’s “going to have his hands full” when they’re teenagers, or that it’s a shame he’s so outnumbered.

Although we’ve never been discontent with our girl gang, the idea of instilling self-confidence and individuality at a young age in my girls weighs heavy on my mind. Raising boys, which of course I have no experience with but know through chatting with friends, research, and watching my own brothers grow up into men, is naturally a different experience and being a mom of only girls is a mental adjustment I’m still working on.

I’m keenly aware of just how closely my five and three year old watch me. Everyday when I get dressed, put on makeup, size up my ever changing body in the mirror, or make snide comments about my body that I don’t think they’ll understand, I’m aware (usually after the fact) of their little brown and blue eyes watching me and their growing minds processing how I see myself. Will they resent me when they’re older for getting eyelash extensions? Am I letting them try out my lipstick too early? Is their wardrobe too “girly”? Am I modeling a balanced perspective of femininity? Did they see me scrolling Instagram admiring the wardrobe/lifestyle/body type/life phase of someone else? How do I, a young mom still very much figuring this whole self-confidence thing out for myself, instill these vital traits in my daughters?

This post is less of a “how to” guide (because in the realm of parenting, those don’t really exist) and more of a conversation around the subject of self-confidence and a few ways I’m working on modeling it in my day to day life in front of the girls. Of course, the same concepts can apply to raising boys too, and whether you’re raising boys or girls, I’d love to hear your tips and suggestions on the subject!

Let them do “big” things

All kids love “helping” their parents do adult-y things and, despite the fact that their efforts to help or join in usually aren’t all that helpful, I think it’s vital for kids to try their hand at the things mom and dad are doing AND feel reinforced in their efforts. For us, it’s usually letting the girls “get ready” with me in the morning, even if they smear lipstick all over their faces or pick out mismatching outfits. It’s letting them stir the cookie batter, even though you know it will be messier and take longer. It’s letting them help clean up and giving them the time to scoop snow with daddy, even if the snow all ends up back in the pathway. These simple (slightly inconvenient) gestures instill confidence in my girls through simply giving them a safe space to experiment, help, and learn new things.

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Don’t classify their appearance

I’ve made this mistake SO MANY TIMES and I’m sure I’ll make it a lot more, but I think especially with girls, it’s so important to let them take the lead when it comes to what they love to wear, how they like their hair done, and even what kind of toys they play with. A few months ago, I was helping Evie get ready for preschool and she walked in with an entirely pink outfit on; from head to toe, bright pink. I mentioned something about that outfit being really “girly” and asked if maybe she wanted to change her pants or something, and for a few weeks afterward she was obsessed with making sure her outfits were “girly enough” and didn’t become “too girly”.

Regardless of my personal taste (which tends to be super neutral, especially for kids), I’m working on letting them pick clothes/toys/hair styles just because they love them, and not necessarily because it fits a certain aesthetic or stereotype.

My girls love beautiful things, as most girls do, and little surprises like their You & Me Tassel Necklaces from Sela Designs are the perfect little accents to start conversations around inner beauty and highlighting it with beautifully made things that they truly love.

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Model self-care

For the first few years of my motherhood journey I rarely made myself a priority. Of course, it’s not easy when you’re raising babies or toddlers or multiples, but as my girls have gotten older and as I’ve done the same, I’ve learned that in order for me to raise them well and lead by example I’ve got to give myself time to recharge.

Self-care may be trendy at the moment, but in practice, it isn’t always easy or glamorous. Sometimes it means forcing a naptime because I can’t function without sleeping. Sometimes it means letting my husband take over bedtime so I can squeeze a shower in after he gets home from work. However it looks each day, I’ve been working on modeling language around caring for myself (especially easy for them to understand while I’m pregnant) and separating it from them. For example, I’m trying not to say things like “mommy needs alone time because you’ve been wearing me out today”. ;)

As they grow up though, I hope they’ll be able to look back and see that self-care is an act of courage sometimes, and that I modeled it well most of the time.

Take the focus off of their appearance early on

Girls grow up with conversations centered on their appearance from such a young age. And, of course, there’s nothing wrong with telling a girl she’s beautiful (that’s important too!), I’m working on mentally rewriting my own script for when it comes to talking to my girls and complimenting them.

I’ll try to focus equally on their character, their choices, or their talents, instead of their appearance only. Pieces like my Round + Square silk scarves or t-shirts (which my girls have been known to steal from time to time) have empowering phrases on them that help spark conversation. Instead of saying how “pretty” their hair looks, I can talk about what being “brave and kind” means or what “#equality” looks like early on, or why “Girl Power” isn’t just a catch phrase.

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I’m still very much a work in progress as a mother, especially as I think about my girls getting older and requiring more and more intentional modeling and behavior.

My job is on the internet, requires me to take photos of myself all the time, get new things, and seems very externally focused on the surface, so I have ample room for improvement and conversation around self-confidence and inner beauty.

How are you having these hard conversations with your kiddos? I’d love to hear your experiences.


*This post is part of a long term collaboration with Sela Designs and ROUND + SQUARE. All content ideas, creative direction, photos, and children are my own ;) Please do not use my photos without permission.*

Tiny Living || Reducing Waste in Our Kitchen

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Since the beginning of my #InspiringZeroWaste challenge in January, I’ve hesitated to tackle one of the biggest areas that my household (and most households, I think) creates waste.

The kitchen.

Smaller space, as I’ve learned, doesn’t mean less waste and sometimes, it can mean producing even more waste for the sake of convenience.

This post won’t portray me as a perfect zero-waster, because the reality is that, especially in the kitchen, I’m far from it. But I’m working on implementing small steps (that I can actually stick with) thanks to this monthly challenge.

Today, I’m excited to share a bit of what I’ve already done to decrease waste in my kitchen — in this post, I’m welcoming the help of Do Good Shop (although you don’t need to buy anything to lessen your waste!). I’ll also share a few goals that I have for the coming month(s) and hopefully spark a bit of inspiration on your end as well.

If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop for ethical home goods, Do Good Shop is a great resource. They’re a non-profit marketplace stocking items that support artisans, end trafficking, and encourage traditional craftsmanship. You’ll be hearing lots more about them in the coming months.

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In my “waste audit” of my tiny kitchen, I learned that packaging and food waste are the two biggest areas my family and I create waste. Although I’m not sure we will ever fully eliminate packaging from our home (packing school lunches without single-wrapped foods is HARD) and I may never find the perfect balance of buying and cooking the perfect amount of food, I’ve found a few ways to consciously reduce waste in these areas that have helped tremendously.

We still produce far too much trash than I’m comfortable with, even for a small family, and I would ideally like to recycle even less than we do (consuming less in general) but reducing waste as a family isn’t easy and I’m choosing to celebrate each small step instead of beat myself up for the long ways I have left to go.

Here are a few ways I’ve gotten started that you can try too:

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  1. DIY as much as you can

    DIY-ing, as much as my aesthetics-loving self hates to admit it, doesn’t have to be pretty. First and foremost, it should solve a problem or expense in your life, ultimately saving you time and money. I’ve fallen in love with DIY-ing my own cleaning supplies which saves my home from unnecessary plastic packaging and the unnecessary toxins found in most cleaning supplies. I also DIY things like tupperware, meaning I’ll reuse packaging certain foods come in to save other food before eventually recycling it. Things like cheese cartons, or even the twist ties found in the produce section can be used in other ways.

  2. Swap cloth for disposables

    It can be a beautifully-made swap, like my cloth napkins from Do Good Shop made by artisans in India using time-honored block printing, or it can be as simple as a cut up old t-shirt to use as cleaning rags. I have (and use) both daily. While my tee-cloths are essential for cleaning the daily messes, I wouldn’t use them to serve as dinner napkins or even something to clean up crumbs or coffee grounds. With these two “products” I’ve eliminated paper towels and other disposable cleaning wipes from my home.

  3. Shop seasonally and avoid plastic where you can

    I won’t even pretend that shopping zero-waste for groceries for a family of almost five is easy, because it isn’t. We have limited access to farmers’ markets and bulk food stores, so I’m usually left with shopping from the organic produce section and crossing my fingers that I remembered my reusable shopping bags. BUT it’s do-able to make a dent in your packaging and plastic intake and it’s worth trying, even if you can’t do it perfectly.

  4. Use your food scraps

    It’s hard to plan how long your food will last and, similarly, how much of it your three and five year old will eat once you make it, but there are ways to reduce your food waste by cooking with unused food scraps and strategically cooking/shopping to reduce extras. I learned about some great ways to use food waste from Going Zero Waste and her newly released book, but you can also do a quick Google search to find lots of inspiration. There are also lots of foods you can regrow from the stems and bottoms, so I’ve been experimenting a lot with that lately too.

  5. Meal Plan

    I’m the worst at meal planning. The absolute worst. In my almost six years of marriage and 5 years of motherhood, I haven’t consistently stuck with it until this year, when I realized how much of a money and sanity saver it really is. Meal planning, it turns out, can significantly reduce your waste in the kitchen too.

Not a super glamorous list, I know, or even what you may have expected (a list full of products you need to buy and eco-switches you need to make). Although products can be helpful for convenience and keeping you motivated, I’ve learned that reducing waste is really a mindset (and ultimately a lifestyle) shift, especially in the kitchen.

I love keeping a few "pretty things” around to keep things cheery and bright, like my Olivewood Serving Tray from Do Good Shop that serves as an in-bed tray, a plant display, a snack server and so much more, and a few pretty napkins and hand towels. But other than that, the kitchen is a place to make messes and get creative, and reducing your waste in the kitchen may not be as pretty as you’d expect either.

My #InspiringZeroWaste goal for this month is to research small space composting! I’d LOVE any resources you know of or tips that have worked well for you. I’m not opposed to an outdoor composting bin (in fact, I’d prefer it) but it needs to be bear and wildlife proof! (#mountainliving).

How hard has reducing waste in the kitchen been in your life? I’d love to hear your tips!


*This post is part of a long term collaboration with Do Good Shop. But all opinions, creative direction, and photographs are my own. Shop the links in this post to support brands that create a better world for artisans all over the world!*

Kitchens are one of the most wasteful areas of most rooms, but you might be surprised at how simple it is to start reducing your trash, even with kids in the house.

Simple, Affordable, Organic Skincare with Bohemian Rêves

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When it comes to skincare, I’m a minimalist at heart. I’ve shared bits and pieces of my skincare lineup before (if you can call it a “lineup”…I really only use one or two products consistently), but each time I have the opportunity to work with a skincare brand I feel extra spoiled. There’s something about taking extra great care of my skin, bathing it in ingredients I can pronounce and trust, and supporting organic, sustainable brands that feels like such a win/win/win.

Pregnancy is a mixed bag when it comes to skin health — for some, they’re glowing like the proverbial goddess for 9 months straight with no concern about switching up their normal routine, for others, they’re battling more breakouts, dryness, and unevenness than they did when they were 14. I’ve been in both camps and have learned to listen to what my body needs (typically, more moisture) at each phase of pregnancy/postpartum/breastfeeding/menstruation, as well as to not stress about whichever “phase” my body is in at the time.

Bohemian Rêves is my newest skincare obsession and once you learn a little more about their ingredients, packaging, and mission, I think you’ll fall in love too.

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Last Spring I shared a post listing my “skincare criteria” when it comes to which products I try and which brands I support. If you missed it, here’s a quick recap of the questions I ask before committing:

1. What is my skin type and what issue am I trying to address? 

2. Can this product be used in more than one way? 

3. How transparent is the brand about their ingredients/sourcing?

4. Is this product worth the investment? 

I’d also add a note to consider the brand’s packaging, since this is my year of #InspiringZeroWaste…

When I consider Bohemian Rêves’ products in relation to these questions, I’m even more convinced they’ve earned their place in my natural (albeit minimal) beauty routine.

The brand crafts all of their products using organic, plant based ingredients. They use glass jars for packaging (which I love to reuse when I’m done), AND they’re much more affordable than other brands I’ve tried in the past. Featuring a beautiful line of body butters, botanical perfumes, face masks, rollers, and more, I’m already hooked on the sweet products they sent over for me to test out.

The Mask

Doing a weekly face mask has become a mini-ritual for me lately, especially at this phase in my pregnancy when rest is hard to come by. Bohemian Rêves’ Rose Clay + Ginseng mask is as luxurious as it sounds and their custom bamboo mask brush makes putting it on simple and mess free. I typically put mine on a few minutes before showering and then let it soak into my skin before washing it off mid-shower.

The Botanical Blends

One of the products I was most excited to try was Bohemian Rêves’ Botanical Blends. I love softer scents and knew that these blends would be just enough of a mood boosting perfume to lighten my mood and keep me feeling just a little bit fancy (I mean, how gorgeous are the bottles?!). I tried the Sol Dorado scent and it’s a fun, citrus-y, earth-y concoction that leaves me feeling awake and smelling fresh.

The Body Butter

Although I primarily requested this body butter for my baby belly — stretch mark prevention and all that jazz — I’ve been using it everywhere and on everyone. Mara is prone to super dry, eczema-like patches, especially in our ultra-dry Colorado winters, and this body butter has helped to keep her skin moisturized and non-itchy.

The Matcha + Green Tea body butter isn’t greasy, like many other body butters out there, and has a light scent that makes it perfect for everyday use.

The Deodorant

Although it’s not pictured, I also tried Bohemian Rêves’ Patchouli and Blood Orange natural deodorant. As someone who is extremely picky when it comes to natural deodorants (and have tried quite a few in my day), this one has come out on top as one my favorites I’ve tried. I’m waiting till I’ve used it for a bit longer to make up my mind officially, but for the first week or so, I’m wonderfully surprised. Instead of many alternative deodorants that use baking soda, this one uses arrowroot powder and magnesium to absorb odor, making it much gentler on the skin.

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If you’re on the hunt for clean skincare alternatives, Bohemian Rêves is the perfect one-stop shop for everything from candles to soap to lotions to cleansing oils. Their ingredients are thoughtful and non-toxic, their packaging is zero waste and reusable, they’re budget friendly, and have products for all skintypes, what more could you ask for?


*This post was sponsored by Bohemian Rêves. All photos, opinions, and creative direction are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make SL&Co. possible!*