Another Fashion Revolution Week is Over...Now What?

This week marked the sixth anniversary of the Rana Plaza Disaster in Bangladesh, where more than one thousand people lost their lives in the collapse of a five story building that served as a production factory for well-known fast fashion chains. This event, although it wasn’t the first of it’s kind or the last, sparked what’s come to be known as the “Fashion Revolution”. Each year, as a tribute to the lives lost and a call to shed light on the malpractice that still exists in the fashion industry, people and brands all over the world demand greater transparency. We ask of our favorite brands, “who made my clothes?” in hopes that the cumulative pressure will result in not only policy change but ground-level, real life, actual change too.

And it’s working.

Last year I shared a post about the strides in the Slow Fashion Movement to date, and I think that if I did a little more digging, I’d find that even more strides were made this year. More awareness was raised, more voices heard, more big brands committed to Fair Trade certification and greater transparency.

But, just because Madewell launched Fair Trade denim or brands like Everlane pledge to go plastic free doesn’t mean that we get to stop. We’ve by no means arrived and the need for an ethical fashion revolution remains more important now than ever.

But #FashionRevolutionWeek is over. So now what?

As inspiring and exciting as it is to have a world-wide week of awareness and action, we don’t get to stop there. Here are a few ways that I think we can keep the motivation going, all year long.

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  1. Keep asking questions

You know those photos of inside out shirts with the tags facing out and the wearer asking the maker “who made my clothes”? Don’t stop doing that. One thing I’ve learned over the past three or four years of communicating with brands is that you should never be scared to press for more information. If a brand you love isn’t transparent about their sourcing, fabrics, or factory conditions (which is truly pretty rare) on their website, don’t be afraid to email. Reach out to customer service via email — it’s much less intimidating than a phone call — and ask for more information on their sustainability and ethics practice. If they send over a generic Code of Conduct policy lacking in specifics, don’t be afraid to see through it and ask for clarification.

Ask questions, make it clear you won’t shop without answers, and if you need it, email me (or someone else who has been there before) for help!

2. Find a community

When, for most of the world, questioning the brands who make their clothes isn’t the norm, it can be overwhelming to “walk the walk” alone. In the beginning of my slow fashion journey, I stumbled on this amazing community of people who taught me and answered my questions about where to shop and how to confront brands and, most of all, taught me that shopping ethically was possible.

If you’re feeling intimidated by the scope of the phrase “quit fast fashion”, don’t worry. There’s a global community of people in the same place as you are, each with their own story and perspective. Find them (online, in real life, via blogs, via a quick Google search) and connect with them. The hunt for slow fashion will be much less intimidating.

Your community can be made up of individuals, but you can also form relationships with ethically-minded brands as well. Malia Designs, the maker of the bag in the photos in this post, was one of the very first brands I ever discovered and one of my very first “real” blog posts, which is why I decided to share about them in today’s post. For 10 years, Malia Designs has been working to fight human trafficking, improve wages, and give artisans a leg up in the Western market, and following their journey since I connected with them has been pretty amazing.

Get connected and you’ll have no shortage of inspiration.

3. Know what to look for

What issues matter most to you when it comes to ethical fashion? It’s hard for any brand, no matter the budget or intention, to check every single box off on the “sustainability and ethics ladder”. Knowing what issues are closest to your heart will help you weed through the overwhelming amount of brands out there and decide which ones you love to support. Is women owned important to you? Size inclusivity? Organic/plant based fabrics? Fair Trade certification? Artisan made? Versatile style? Supporting issues like trafficking and human rights?

See? It’s not simple. But it’s worth it.

4. Shop less (but better)

The bulk of deciding to shop more sustainably is to adjust your mindset. Overconsumption is the root issue of fast fashion and the exploitation at it’s heart is fueled by our (the consumers’) need for moremoremore. Create a capsule wardrobe, pare down your closet, invest in more expensive pieces that will last you decades instead of seasons.

5. Share with your “audience”

Whether you think so or not, you have an audience. Your family, your community, your kids, your co-workers, your social media connections. Start sharing, maybe slowly at first, about why you’ve transformed your shopping habits, and watch as your passion spreads.

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Of course, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to sustainability or ethical fashion, but if we can keep the momentum going, as a unified community supporting each other’s perspectives and voices, there’s no doubt in my mind that this year can be the biggest year yet.

A little bit about Malia Designs:

Aside from their obviously unique appreciation of detail and re-purposing, Malia Designs is a true leader in the sustainable and ethical fashion scene. They employ men and women from three groups of Fair Trade Certified artisans in Cambodia. These men and women are often at higher risk of trafficking and having a fair, dignified source of income is life changing.

They use recycled and upcycled materials for their bags and accessories. Upcycled cotton canvas, recycled feed and cement bags and other materials help clean up the streets of Cambodia and decrease pollution from new production.

If you’re looking for a model of “what to look for” in a brand, browse Malia Designs’ website for shockingly refreshing transparency, photos of their artisans, and all of the details you need to make an informed purchase.

What now? How will you take the motivation of Fashion Revolution Week and run with it into the rest of the year?


*This post was sponsored by Malia Designs. All opinions, creative direction, and photos are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make this blog possible (and the world a better place).*

The Natural Edition || Sustainable AND Affordable Basics

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Last month I shared a giant round up answering a frequently asked “where to shop for ethically made basics”. Today, I’m excited to dive in deep with one of the brands featured there and one I’ve been honored to work alongside for several months now.

Forever drawn to all things neutral, versatile, and timeless, The Natural Edition has quickly worked it’s way to hold the grand title of “most worn brand” in my closet. This brand, more than just another brand who has jumped on the “sustainability bandwagon”, The Natural Edition, owned by fashion industry guru Nicole Adamo, has truly taken every aspect of creating a piece of clothing into consideration and made the most sustainable choice possible for the planet, the garment creator, and the consumer.

Today’s post will give you a deeper look into the decisions that brand owners have to face when setting out to make a truly sustainable brand. It’s not a black and white arena and, as you’ll see, there are lots of aspects that we as consumers oftentimes don’t consider or underestimate the complexity of when it comes to ethical production. Learning from the brand owners I’m lucky enough to work with is one of my favorite parts of my little job and I hope you get as excited as I do reading about the “behind the scenes” of it all.

The “Basics”

Before we get into the backstory, here’s a brief overview of who The Natural Edition is in a nutshell:

  • Where: The Natural Edition is based in the UK and produces their clothing using a Dutch/Turkish factory that’s Fairwear audited.

  • What: The brand, newly launched this year, has a first collection of versatile basics including tees and dresses made from GOTS-certified organic cotton and Tencel (read more about both of those fabrics in my Ethical Basics Guide!)

  • Who: TNE is owned by Nicole Adamo. She’s no stranger to the fashion industry and owned a successful luxury-wear brand sold in stores all over the UK. She felt unfulfilled though and constantly worn down by the harmful effects of fast fashion, so she decided to switch gears and create a brand that would do good in the world.

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From Fast to Slow, TNE’s Backstory:

The Transition: “I immersed myself in research, attended every talk and event that was on in London that addressed sustainability or ethical production and while researching more into sustainability and the issues decided it was important to influence the hardest working pieces of the wardrobe- wardrobe essentials. Starting a sustainable and ethical fashion brand was a lot more difficult than a luxury brand..firstly it was very different production to what I made before so I had to find a new factory…after working in luxury fashion my quality standards are very high and this proved a bit of barrier.”

The Fabric: “We started with sampling in the UK with the plan on producing in the UK as we could do smaller quantities and I could oversee production, however the quality was not to my standard. When we first started sampling our main jersey was bamboo as many brands cite this as eco-friendly but after further research realised that bamboo was not eco-friendly due to lack of transparency with sourcing and the amount of chemical needed to turn it into fabric. I became aware that there was confusion over what was sustainable and not well researched information doing the rounds.”

…”we had to make our own signature fabrics that were bespoke with the downside being the minimums were high the upside being we could get what we wanted which was super premium sustainably sourced fabric that was super soft and luxurious. I looked for a designer who was experienced in athleisure as my designs were all about combining style with comfort and found someone who was the designer for Beyonce’s Ivy Park and Sweaty Betty who had just gone freelance with her baby on the way. “

The Packaging: …”I assumed a factory that only makes for sustainable brands had a solution that was NOT plastic..but they didn’t as no one had figured it out and those biodegradable bags just break down to micro-plastics. Currently, nearly all garments are packed in a plastic polybag before leaving the factory and end up as landfill, or worse, in the oceans and we did not want our legacy to be that. At the final hour we found a packaging supplier that was willing to experiment and we designed a kraft card pouch so we could say no to the poly bag!”

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As strange as this partnership may seem at this point in my life (ie. 9 months pregnant and very well out of clothing that truly fits), The Natural Edition is one of the few brands I’ve been able to wear for my entire pregnancy. The intentionally oversized design — with extra length in the sleeves and at the bottom of tees — along with the rounded hems has made each item I own from TNE truly worth its “weight” in my closet.

The pieces hold up to daily life (real daily life…I’m a pregnant mama to two over here…), wash extremely well, stretch when and where they need to without becoming droopy, and go with just about everything in my closet.

I’ll be wearing them all for years to come and am so grateful to have connected with a brand who truly understands the need for well-made, fairly-made pieces for real life at a real-life price point.

You can shop Nicole’s gorgeous first collection here, and don’t forget to use my code LIV20 for 20% off your order!

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*This post is the last of a long term ambassador partnership with The Natural Edition. Thank you for supporting the brands that make SL&Co. possible! As always, all photos, opinions, and baby bumps are mine ;) *

Tiny Living || Reducing Waste in Our Kitchen

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Since the beginning of my #InspiringZeroWaste challenge in January, I’ve hesitated to tackle one of the biggest areas that my household (and most households, I think) creates waste.

The kitchen.

Smaller space, as I’ve learned, doesn’t mean less waste and sometimes, it can mean producing even more waste for the sake of convenience.

This post won’t portray me as a perfect zero-waster, because the reality is that, especially in the kitchen, I’m far from it. But I’m working on implementing small steps (that I can actually stick with) thanks to this monthly challenge.

Today, I’m excited to share a bit of what I’ve already done to decrease waste in my kitchen — in this post, I’m welcoming the help of Do Good Shop (although you don’t need to buy anything to lessen your waste!). I’ll also share a few goals that I have for the coming month(s) and hopefully spark a bit of inspiration on your end as well.

If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop for ethical home goods, Do Good Shop is a great resource. They’re a non-profit marketplace stocking items that support artisans, end trafficking, and encourage traditional craftsmanship. You’ll be hearing lots more about them in the coming months.

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In my “waste audit” of my tiny kitchen, I learned that packaging and food waste are the two biggest areas my family and I create waste. Although I’m not sure we will ever fully eliminate packaging from our home (packing school lunches without single-wrapped foods is HARD) and I may never find the perfect balance of buying and cooking the perfect amount of food, I’ve found a few ways to consciously reduce waste in these areas that have helped tremendously.

We still produce far too much trash than I’m comfortable with, even for a small family, and I would ideally like to recycle even less than we do (consuming less in general) but reducing waste as a family isn’t easy and I’m choosing to celebrate each small step instead of beat myself up for the long ways I have left to go.

Here are a few ways I’ve gotten started that you can try too:

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  1. DIY as much as you can

    DIY-ing, as much as my aesthetics-loving self hates to admit it, doesn’t have to be pretty. First and foremost, it should solve a problem or expense in your life, ultimately saving you time and money. I’ve fallen in love with DIY-ing my own cleaning supplies which saves my home from unnecessary plastic packaging and the unnecessary toxins found in most cleaning supplies. I also DIY things like tupperware, meaning I’ll reuse packaging certain foods come in to save other food before eventually recycling it. Things like cheese cartons, or even the twist ties found in the produce section can be used in other ways.

  2. Swap cloth for disposables

    It can be a beautifully-made swap, like my cloth napkins from Do Good Shop made by artisans in India using time-honored block printing, or it can be as simple as a cut up old t-shirt to use as cleaning rags. I have (and use) both daily. While my tee-cloths are essential for cleaning the daily messes, I wouldn’t use them to serve as dinner napkins or even something to clean up crumbs or coffee grounds. With these two “products” I’ve eliminated paper towels and other disposable cleaning wipes from my home.

  3. Shop seasonally and avoid plastic where you can

    I won’t even pretend that shopping zero-waste for groceries for a family of almost five is easy, because it isn’t. We have limited access to farmers’ markets and bulk food stores, so I’m usually left with shopping from the organic produce section and crossing my fingers that I remembered my reusable shopping bags. BUT it’s do-able to make a dent in your packaging and plastic intake and it’s worth trying, even if you can’t do it perfectly.

  4. Use your food scraps

    It’s hard to plan how long your food will last and, similarly, how much of it your three and five year old will eat once you make it, but there are ways to reduce your food waste by cooking with unused food scraps and strategically cooking/shopping to reduce extras. I learned about some great ways to use food waste from Going Zero Waste and her newly released book, but you can also do a quick Google search to find lots of inspiration. There are also lots of foods you can regrow from the stems and bottoms, so I’ve been experimenting a lot with that lately too.

  5. Meal Plan

    I’m the worst at meal planning. The absolute worst. In my almost six years of marriage and 5 years of motherhood, I haven’t consistently stuck with it until this year, when I realized how much of a money and sanity saver it really is. Meal planning, it turns out, can significantly reduce your waste in the kitchen too.

Not a super glamorous list, I know, or even what you may have expected (a list full of products you need to buy and eco-switches you need to make). Although products can be helpful for convenience and keeping you motivated, I’ve learned that reducing waste is really a mindset (and ultimately a lifestyle) shift, especially in the kitchen.

I love keeping a few "pretty things” around to keep things cheery and bright, like my Olivewood Serving Tray from Do Good Shop that serves as an in-bed tray, a plant display, a snack server and so much more, and a few pretty napkins and hand towels. But other than that, the kitchen is a place to make messes and get creative, and reducing your waste in the kitchen may not be as pretty as you’d expect either.

My #InspiringZeroWaste goal for this month is to research small space composting! I’d LOVE any resources you know of or tips that have worked well for you. I’m not opposed to an outdoor composting bin (in fact, I’d prefer it) but it needs to be bear and wildlife proof! (#mountainliving).

How hard has reducing waste in the kitchen been in your life? I’d love to hear your tips!


*This post is part of a long term collaboration with Do Good Shop. But all opinions, creative direction, and photographs are my own. Shop the links in this post to support brands that create a better world for artisans all over the world!*

Kitchens are one of the most wasteful areas of most rooms, but you might be surprised at how simple it is to start reducing your trash, even with kids in the house.

Simply Styled || One Blazer, Three Ways

I’m excited to be kicking off a new post format today! Most of my blog posts are pretty detailed, researched, and in depth, but sometimes it’s fun to lighten things up and just share some genuine outfit inspiration featuring a few sustainable pieces. These “Simply Styled” posts will be my attempt to inspire real life outfits for you, get my own creativity flowing, and simplify some of my partnerships to offer a more “for fun” option.

So, without further ado, my very first Simply Styled post, featuring a gorgeously made jacket by La Fille Colette.

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Structured blazers are very “in” right now and although I always feel too lawyer-y when I put one on, I love the slight structure of La Fille Colette’s Portmanteau Jacket that gives an outfit a “blazer vibe” without the shoulder pads and formality. I decided to style this piece a few different ways because I’ve been feeling extra “blah” about my style lately — living in leggings at 31 weeks pregnant means this mama needed an approachable way to feel slightly stylish again without being uncomfortable.

Here’s a bit about La Fille Colette before we dive in. Sourced and sewn in Massachusetts, this sweet brand creates pieces for the “feminine and strong woman who seeks versatile, polished pieces to take her from day to night”. They offer up to a size 2x in the Portmanteau Jacket, which is made from Lenzing Rayon (read more about that fabric in my “basics” post from last week!) The jacket has a shawl collar, a removable belt (that I opted out of because it doesn’t wrap all the way around me at the moment ;), side pockets, an a hook and eye closure at the front. It’s fitted through the arms but roomy enough to layer underneath easily.

So here’s my take on the blazer trend: three different styling options for one jacket. None of these looks are maternity specific and most of the pieces are “normal”, meaning anyone should be able to pull pieces from their closets to recreate these looks!

Which is your favorite? Let me know in the comments!

Boyfriend Jeans + Graphic Tee

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This option is probably the most versatile way to wear the jacket. It’s casual and I’d wear it just about anywhere. The mules help give it a bit of elevation, but if I wasn’t going anywhere fun, I’d probably just wear sneakers.

Tee: ROUND+SQUARE, Jeans: thrifted non-maternity Levis (rubber band trick. friends), Watch: Berg+Betts, Clutch and mules: Kolt Handmade

Breton Striped Dress + Sneakers

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Dressed down with sneakers, this outfit is a fun mix of dressy and casual that would be great for a weekend dinner or brunch or anytime I’d want to fill a little extra fancy.

Dress: The Natural Edition (use code LIV20 for 20% off), Purse: Findlay Co. , Shoes: Vans (SUPER old)

Jumpsuit + Booties

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I ran out of time to shoot this outfit on, but I love how the Portmanteau Jacket elevates the casual jumpsuit. The woven basket adds a hint of spring and the booties dress it up a little bit more.

Jumpsuit: Boob Design (bf-friendly and maternity friendly! Code LIVANDBOOB20 for 20% off), Scarf: ROUND+SQUARE, Booties: Adelante Shoe Co., Bag: Jones + Co.

How would you style this sweet and versatile jacket?

I’m excited to continue this Simply Styled series as I need the occasional style boost or when I get a new piece I need to experiment with.


*I received the Portmanteau Jacket to style for this post. Thank you for supporting the brands that make SL&Co. possible*

Where to Shop for Ethically Made Basics (for All Bodies and Budgets)

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Whether you fancy yourself a fashionista or wear clothes for the primary purpose of, you know, being clothed, basics are the cornerstone of a well rounded wardrobe. You know the ones, the white v-neck tee you wore till it had holes in the armpits and looked more yellow than white from coffee stains. The t-shirt dress you can dress up or dress down effortlessly. The striped long sleeve shirt you can wear anytime you want to add a layer or two of Parisian style to your day to day.

Try as I may, I can’t seem to gravitate from a wardrobe made up of mostly basics. And now that I’m more familiar with my style and “life-style” than ever, I don’t really want to. Even in outfits where I throw on a statement piece, like my MATTER Prints pants, I pair it with a basic to keep it feeling like “me”. Most days, you can find me in a striped tee and jeans (although, at nearly 8 months pregnant, I’m ditching the jeans most days). In the summer, a pair of mom shorts and a cozy button up or tank top are just fine.

Basics are the cornerstone of a well-rounded wardrobe. Make sure they're made to last when you buy from these ethical and sustainable brands.

However, considering the wear and tear that most basics get, I’m finding it more and more important to invest in ones that are made well. There are some pieces that work well buying secondhand, but for basics, buying new, from brands you trust, ensures the long life of the product.

Fabric content and quality, production standards, and price tag all pay a role in finding basics that will actually last more than a season. Most brands, ethical or not, have some kind of collection of basics, but finding the ones that will last AND are worth supporting can be tricky.

This post, I hope, will act as a resource when you’re on the hunt for a new closet staple. It’s not an exhaustive list, of course, but it does include the majority of brands I know, love, and have tried in real life. I’ll be focusing on textile type (NOT a black and white matter, as you’ll soon see) size inclusivity, ethics and price point making notes on which brands prioritize what aspect.


Fabrics to Look For

  • Organic Cotton

    • As conventional non-organic cotton becomes rightfully more and more controversial, GOTS certified organic cotton is a highly sustainable alternative that is making it’s way into more and more brands’ pieces. Conventional cotton is widely grown worldwide and it uses a shocking 6% of the world’s pesticides and 16% of the world’s insecticides. (Source). Furthermore, it takes 2700 liters of water to make a single t-shirt. These chemicals are both harmful to the consumer and, mostly, to the farmer growing the crops and to the environment.

    • Organic cotton on the other hand, uses no chemicals, pesticides, or insecticides to produce, isn’t hazardous to the health of the farmers, and uses much less water to grow and turn into fabric.

    • A Quick side note on cotton: I got a few questions about the difference between conventional cotton, Pima cotton, and organic cotton so here’s a quick breakdown in addition to what’s above.

      • Conventional cotton: grown worldwide in relatively unregulated conditions, usually using harsh chemicals

      • Pima cotton: called the “cashmere of cotton”, Pima cotton is simply a higher quality cotton than conventional. It yields a longer fiber which makes for a softer, better quality fabric. (Source). It can be both organic and non organic.

      • Organic cotton: cotton grown without the use of any chemicals or pesticides. This is the ideal type of cotton for sustainability, health, and fabric quality.

  • Hemp

    • Hemp is one of the most sustainable fabrics out there. It requires little water and grows extremely fast (producing around 250% more crop in the same amount of land as cotton). (Source).

    • Similar to linen, hemp produces a sturdy fabric that wears well and lasts years. It’s also naturally UV ray resistant. It can be blended with other fibers, like organic cotton, to yield a variety of textures and weights.

  • Linen

    • Linen, like hemp, is easy and quick to grow/harvest and requires even less water than organic cotton. It’s moisture resistant, becomes softer with wear/wash, and biodegrades when you’re done!

    • It’s grown from the flax plant, which is able to be used in its entirety, meaning no part of the plant is wasted. (Source).

  • Tencel/Lyocell/Modal

    • Here is when the controversy sets in. Few people will argue any cons about the above fabrics, but these last two definitely aren’t pure sustainability.

    • All three of these fabrics are created and made by Lenzing, in a closed-loop process. They’re similar, but made from different plants using the same process.

    • Pros:

      • Tencel (Lyocell) is a cellulose fiber marketed by Lenzing (the third generation fabric of second generation modal) made from the pulp of sustainably harvest eucalyptus trees certified by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC). Modal is made from the pulp of beech trees.

      • All three are produced in a closed-loop process, which means that all resources/materials/solvents used to produce it are recycled back into the process to do it over again.

      • It uses less water than organic cotton

      • Since it’s a naturally derived fiber, it’s also biodegradable

    • Cons:

      • It’s not a chemical free process and conventional chemicals are used to turn the fabric into Tencel from wood pulp (however, Lenzing noted that it has a 99% recovery rate of the solvents due to the closed-loop process). (Source).

      • The production method uses a lot more energy than is ideal. No fabric is exempt from using energy, but Lenzing has work to do in the coming years to produce a product that uses less energy to produce. (Source).

  • Bamboo Rayon/Vicose vs. Bamboo “Monocel”

    • Pros:

      • Although calling a fabric “bamboo” is slightly misleading because of of the processes the bamboo goes through to become a textile, it is plant based which means it will biodegrade.

      • Bamboo self-regenerates from its own roots, requiring little water and little grow time.

      • Bamboo Monocel is another Lyocell fabric, but this time made from bamboo, so it’s made in a closed loop, more environmentally friendly process. However, it’s harder to find.

    • Cons:

      • Although the cultivation phase may be more eco-friendly than growing cotton, manufacturing the fabric from bamboo is when the cons arise.

      • Most bamboo fabrics are labeled “rayon from bamboo” and the process to create this fabric is similar to that of Tencel or Modal but MUCH less sustainable since it isn’t a closed loop process, so the chemicals are released into the environment without reusing them. (Source). It’s essentially a synthetic fabric derived from a natural fiber.

      • There isn’t evidence that the properties of bamboo (UV ray resistant, antibacterial, water resistant) are present after the bamboo is processed into fabric.

Of course, there are plenty of ethical brands that use synthetic fibers to create their basics and any brand that takes steps towards sustainability should be lauded for their work. I would, however, push the envelope even further by asking if they consider themselves holistically “ethical” if they aren’t prioritizing the use of truly natural fibers and working to minimize their brand’s footprint.

It seems fairly cut and dry doesn’t it? Simply choose fabrics that are 100% organic and made from natural fibers at all costs.

However, like most issues of ethics and sustainability, it’s not always that simple.

The Unsustainable Reality Check

Why, you might ask, would any brand owner ever choose to use fabrics that are factually not great for the environment? I’ve noticed that bamboo derived fabrics are especially popular among ethical brands — have they just not done their research? I don’t think that’s the usually case.

The reality is that brands have A LOT to factor in when it comes to producing a quality product. First, they have to consider where the fabric they’re planning to use was grown, before it’s ever harvested or turned into fabric. Were the farmers treated fairly? Paid a living wage (an issue all on its own)? They have to source a fabric (regardless of what kind it is) from a responsible factory that pays its employees well. They need to design a product that represents their clientele well. They need to design a product that won’t disintegrate after a few wears/washes. They need to consider affordability and the “true cost” of the product and charge accordingly without marking it up too much or too little.

Obviously, you know all of this. But I think it’s all too easy to judge brands a bit harshly for not scoring a perfect 100% on the ethics/sustainability/inclusivity/price front. Indeed, we as the consumers should push for high standards and hold our ethical brands to even higher ones, but celebrating progress and steps in the right direction is important for growth in the industry too.

Ethical shopping isn’t a black and white matter in the least, not even when you’re trying to buy something as simple as a new white tee.

All of that said, below are a few brands that I’ve fallen for and whom, I believe, meet the criteria to be considered ethical/sustainable/inclusive and worth supporting.


Brands to Love

Encircled

Price point: $$-$$$

Encircled is a Canadian brand that prioritizes quality, longevity, and versatility. I’ve worked with them several times, own 3 or 4 pieces from them, and can say with full confidence that their pieces are worth the investment. On the size inclusivity chart, Encircled ranks higher than most with pieces that are meant to fit a wide range of sizes and, of course, fluctuate with your own body throughout life’s seasons. They offer sizes xs-xxl and considering that most of their styles are stretchy and oversized, can fit quite the range of body types.

As far as sustainability and fabric choice goes, they offer a healthy mix of fabric types. The majority of pieces I’ve tried from their line have been a Lenzing Modal blend (incredibly soft, stretchy and durable). They also work a lot with bamboo based products for its softness, but blend it with cotton for the strength and durability.

I chatted with Kristi, Encircled’s founder and designer about the murky issue of choosing sustainable fabrics and she wisely noted that oftentimes 100% natural fibers don’t hold up as well over time when they aren’t blended with other fabrics (oftentimes elastane, polyester or lycra) and, instead of creating a fully sustainable product that deteriorates more quickly, have opted to balance the two by mixing their natural fibers with less sustainable options for the sake of the longevity of the garment. Sustainability can be argued from both sides in this matter and although I don’t claim to be an expert, I can say that Encircled’s pieces truly stand the test of real life and real bodies.

(Pictured above: Encircled’s Nomadic V-Neck and Encircled’s Everyday T-Shirt Dress (soon to be released!))

The Natural Edition

Price point: $-$$

You’ve all heard me rave about The Natural Edition’s basics for a few months now, but I’ll say it again — I’m so impressed with this newly launched brand and their dreamy first collection of basics. I’ve spoken extensively with Nicole, the brand’s designer and owner, and she, like Kristi of Encircled, noted the struggle that goes into creating a brand that is as sustainable as it is practical and high quality.

The Natural Edition’s first collection features pieces made of GOTS certified organic cotton and Tencel, both of which (especially organic cotton) rank high on the sustainability charts. Their first collection is likewise oversized, excluding the Striped Breton Dress which fits true to size, with sizes ranging from xs-l (Nicole noted that this most accurately means sizes US 4-12). She’s also told me that her plan is to include more and more sizing options as her collections grow.

(Pictured above: The Stretch Jersey Long Sleeve Top and The Organic Cotton Oversized V-Neck. Use the code LIV20 for 20% off.)

LA Relaxed

Price Point: $-$$$

Another amazing brand with a wide selection of styles, sizes, and fabrics, LA Relaxed creates some of the coziest and easy to wear pieces I’ve ever tried. They’ve recently added hemp and organic cotton to their repertoire which is a huge step towards ultra-sustainability. They also use Tencel and Modal fabric so you can rest assured that their pieces are even softer than they look.

As far as sizing goes, they offer sizes xs-xxl (conventional 0-18) which is beautifully inclusive. I’ve worn all of the pieces I have from them during my third trimester and they’ve accommodated my baby bump perfectly.

(Pictured above: The Norah Dress in grey and the Lila Tank in black stripe. Use the code SIMPLY25 for 25% off.)

ROUND + SQUARE

Price point: $-$$

ROUND + SQUARE is one of the most mission driven and sustainably focused brands I’ve encountered in a while. All (yes, all) of their pieces are made with organic cotton (aside from their bandanas and scarves which are 100% silk). They sell a line of thoughtfully designed tees meant to inspire equality. Although their graphic tees are pretty amazing — you’ll see more of those soon — their solid color shirts are beautifully made, slightly thin and stretchy, and come in a lovely variety of colors.

Their sizing is refreshingly inclusive as well, offering xxs-xl with an emphasis on oversized fit. Their models show a variety of body types that will hopefully make ordering the correct size easier!

(Pictured above: The Relaxed Long Sleeve Tee in plum and the Basic Boxy tee in Olive Nights. The first photo in this post features their Sunflower Silk Bandana.)

Honorable Mentions:


Let’s end this novel of a post by restating that slow fashion is messy and choosing to support sustainable brands comes with lots of grey area that, luckily, is up to the consumer to push for and decide what to prioritize.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the sustainable fabrics listed above or any other struggles you might face when trying to shop for not-so-basic-basics.


*This post is part of a long-term collaboration between several brands and myself. As always, all opinions, photographs, and storytelling are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make SL&Co possible!*