Sourcery the Label || Luxury Simplified

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Motherhood isn’t a luxurious business.

It’s messy and sleepy and, usually, a general blur. It’s taken me three kids to somewhat get my feet under me and still, there are days where it’s all I can do to pull on a pair of leggings and do the dishes. Between the spit up stains, crayon markings, and spilled dinners, I need a wardrobe that can keep up with my messy reality.

When most people think of silk — the worm-grown fabric that’s been craved for centuries around the world — the words “practical” or “day to day” don’t usually come to mind. In fact, the fabric usually conjures up the opposite. Words like “luxury” and “excess” typically spring to mind.

Buy why, I ask, can’t we demand both? Can “practical luxury” be a reality too?

Motherhood (or any other lifestyle) doesn’t have a one-size-fits all aesthetic (or fabric) and our wardrobes shouldn’t either. Sourcery is one label on a mission to mix practicality and luxury with their machine washable silk garments.

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The Fabric

Yep. It’s Machine washable. Aside from the environmental and health issues associated with most dry-cleaners, the majority of us don’t have time to drop our clothes off somewhere else to be washed. That’s the kind of excess and “luxury” that most silk garments demand, until now.

Sourcery creates all of their pieces from silk that can be washed at home, free from the risk of carcinogens and other toxins at the dry-cleaners. The fabric is incredibly light-weight and soft, but durable. It doesn’t stain easily, like other silks I’ve worn and, if something happens, you can toss it in the washing machine on cold and wash with the rest of your clothes.

The Factory

Sourcery is incredibly transparent about where they source their silk and where it’s dyed and spun into fabric. Their raw silk is sourced from a supplier located where silk production originated 5,000 years ago. The fabric is dyed using Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certification, which means it’s free of most chemicals present in most dye-houses.

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I know the price tag may seem intimidating to those of us who shop with “practicality” in mind, but hear me out. The durability and quality of this fabric means it will last for years. Whereas a cheaper fabric — one sewn in questionable factories using questionable ethics and cheap fabrics — will likely deteriorate over several wears or require expensive dry cleaning under the guise of false expense. Sourcery’s washable silk, on the other hand, will last for years with proper care (which luckily means just machine washing it). The wear/cost breakdown makes Sourcery’s pieces far more sustainable AND cost-effective in the long run.

The Wide Leg Silk Crop pants pair well with dressier button down tops for work wear or they can be worn day-to-day, perfect for this work from home mama, with a simple tee or crop top, like my go-to ones shown here from ROUND + SQUARE. I’m excited to layer my denim jacket over the top and add my favorite booties as the weather begins the cool.

One thing I’ve learned in my (almost) six years of motherhood is that when I feel like I’ve put effort into myself, be it my outfit, some extra rest, time to pursue a passion, or anything else, I’m all the more equipped to be the kind of mother my kids deserve.

Sourcery enables me to run and chase and meal plan and baby-wear and mother while feeling like I haven’t lost any bits of my identity along the way. Practical luxury at it’s very finest.

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*This post was sponsored by Sourcery Label. All opinions, photos, and creative direction are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make this blog possible!*

HowGood is Your Amazon Cart? This Plug-in Can Help

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If you’re a human with access to the internet, chances are you shop on Amazon relatively regularly. The sheer volume of products available in one spot is too much for our convenience loving hearts to avoid and, despite my issues with their excessive packaging and, unfortunately, morals as a company, I find myself shopping from Amazon semi-regularly too.

Living in a very (very) rural area - yes, I live on a literal mountaintop - I don’t have easy access to places like Target, Wholefoods, Trader Joes, or other health stores within a two-ish hour drive. So when I need to order something quickly that I don’t have nearby, and when I can’t pack up three kids and head to Denver, Amazon is often the simplest choice.

But, being the online superstore that it is, the excessive amount of options can be overwhelming to me. It’s harder than browsing the aisles of a store since there’s almost every option and brand known to man and womankind at the click of a button. I’m used to being picky about what I buy for my family, but ever since I discovered HowGood, it’s made finding healthy products on Amazon much less of a hassle.

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HowGood recently launched a simple plugin for your computer. Once installed, it will give you instant advice about the “goodness” of a product you may be interested in. HowGood believes the path to sustainability lies in transparency, especially when it comes to our food and the products we use in and on our bodies. Since the FDA is notoriously lax when it comes to regulating skincare and often allows ingredients that are knowingly harmful for our bodies, it feels like the consumer can’t rely on “regulations” when it comes to staying healthy.

That’s where HowGood hopes to simplify things.

As a website, they’ve rated more than 1 million products with only 5% earning the highest rating. They’ve build a team of researchers, gathering data from more than 350+ sources, and are committed to telling the story behind our food and other products and hopefully, in time, changing the face of the industry. (Click here to see how they evaluate a product for safety and sustainability.)

Their app, and now their newly launched plugin for Google Chrome, gives consumers access to their research and info on the sustainability and healthiness of a product, both in stores and online. Their plugin currently works on Amazon for baby related products (think wipes, diapers, baby lotions, etc), and they'll soon be expanding to include cosmetics and hopefully even more.

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Although I admittedly try to limit my Amazon shopping, it’s so nice to have the plugin as a backup to check the safety of the things I’m ordering for Aria and my older girls. When things labeled as “natural” or even organic generally aren’t so natural, having a deeper look into the ingredients and even the undisclosed fragrances and other sneaky chemicals that make up our go-to products is helpful. When HowGood gives a product a bad rating, it will recommend other safer alternatives for you to check out easily, without having to dig through the depths of Amazon’s inventory.

You can download HowGood’s app on your iPhone or Android to take with you to the grocery store and you can add their Chrome plug-in to your browser to make your online shopping as toxin-free as possible.

Although I haven’t placed my order yet, these water wipes (I haven’t quite gotten to the level of feeling comfortable with zero-waste wipes yet), Vitamind D drop, toxin free sunscreen, and prenatal vitamins are all sitting in my cart with the help of the HowGood plug-in.

Do you shop on Amazon? Would this plug-in help set your mind at ease?


*This post was sponsored by HowGood to promote their new plug-in. Thank you for supporting the brands and organizations that make SL&Co. possible.*

Minimal Kids: Encouraging Imaginative Play in Small Space Living

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Quite easily the most common question I’m asked after someone learns that we live in an RV goes somewhere along the lines of “but how do your kids play in there?”. There’s an underlying assumption that the smaller the space or the fewer the toys the unhappier the child.

Allow me to beg to differ.

We’ve never had a lot a lot of toys for our kids (mostly because the minute I became I mom I immersed myself in minimalism and have gradually been trying to strike a healthy balance ever since). I’ve always tried to encourage my kids to lean into boredom, be thankful for what they have, and not base our playtime around “things”. But this phase of life where we’re intentionally limiting ourselves (spatially) has taught me a lot about how kids (or at least my kids) play and how to foster an environment that encourages them to lean heavily on their imaginations instead of their toys.

Also, my girls have plenty of toys, trust me. I’m not a miserly mother who doesn’t believe in letting my kids have “things”. They have lots of things. But I hope this post can act as both clarification and inspiration for anyone who is curious about imaginative play, regardless of your house size.

To a child, just about anything can be a toy. I’m constantly amazed by Evie’s ingenuity — she’s my maker; constantly building, creating, drawing, tying, sewing, re-purposing. Mara is just as imaginative, but she prefers to play with her dollhouse, ride her bike, or dress up as whichever queen/mom/friend/animal/hero she’s obsessed with at the moment (as long as it involves shoes). Their interests and imagination styles are polar opposites but somehow, they haven’t run out of space or ideas for what to do yet.

Although I can’t take credit for their creativity and ability to play well together, I’ll share a few things I’ve intentionally done to foster that environment as much as possible and, ideally, create a home that they don’t get bored of or feel stifled by.

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  1. Choose “open ended” toys

All of the toys in our RV are relatively open ended, meaning my girls can use them to play multiple ways. My girls love their dress up clothes, like the butterfly wings, cape (made from recycled Saris) and crowns all ethically made from Do Good Shop, one of my favorite one-stop fair trade shops, especially for families. They use these pieces almost every day and have dreamed up so many different roles and scenarios to play in. I love that these pieces aren’t specific to any story/movie/game so my girls can imagine that they’re just about anything (as opposed to, for example, their Elsa and Anna dresses which are more limiting in their “line of thoughts”).

In addition to dress up things, they have a small play kitchen from Ikea, a basket of their favorite stuffed animals (Evie wants to be a “pet shop owner” when she grows up, so these get lots of use), some Mega Bloks and a set of wooden blocks to make roads for cars, a small dollhouse with mini animals/furniture/clothes, and lots of coloring supplies and play dough.

They also have a basket of books that we swap out each week when we go to the library and they spend their “quiet time” reading to each other.

Toys like these allow my girls to get more creative than other toys with a more structured purpose. They can play with all of them at once (and usually, they do), or only a few at a time, but they haven’t run out of exciting combinations yet.

2. Swap them out regularly

To stave off boredom with their toys, we have a few more options in storage (where we have the rest of our “house stuff” at my parents’ house) and sometimes I’ll switch out stuffed animals, bring in a new game, or exchange their blocks for other toys to keep them excited and interested. This practice works regardless of the size of your house and makes it like they’re getting new toys when really you’re just pulling pre-owned things out of storage.

3. Encourage outdoor play

The most important part of encouraging my kids to play imaginatively, I believe, is making sure they get tons of time away from their toys. The majority of their playtime, especially in the warmer months, is outdoors, where they’re building forts, getting dirty, exploring nearby, and simply put, being kids. I know not everyone has the space or lifestyle where they can get outdoors frequently, but even a daily walk or trip to the park is beneficial for kids. In nature, children can imagine anything, become anything they want to be, and experience the world in it’s purest form, without plastic toys or man-made interventions. The accessibility to the outdoors is one of the main reasons we’ve chosen this lifestyle and this location specifically.

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4. Get comfortable with messiness

There’s a time and place for structured play and clean up time, but I also believe that in order for imagination to thrive, things have to get messy. Even though I tend to be fairly laid back as a parent, it’s taken me a while to get comfortable with the idea of letting my girls turn their room into a jungle or a mansion or a pet store or the wild west knowing the inevitable battle that will follow when they have to clean it all up.

Small spaces are destroyed in half the time, so cleaning up after each round of play has been the only way I’ve been able to mesh the importance of fostering their imagination with my need for some semblance of structure.

When they’re outside, all hopes of staying clean goes out the window. They’re constantly riding bikes, digging, building with rocks and sticks, and meeting little bugs. Even though the increased frequency of bathtime (or, if we’re being honest, a quick wipe off at night) is just another thing on my to-do list, I love that they’re able to get messy and really explore with all of their senses every single day.

As I type all of this out, I’m realizing how simple it all sounds. Small space living, when met with two incredibly imaginative kids, isn’t really restrictive at all, it feels very intuitive. Every day is a new chance to turn their space into something new, a new chance to get messy, explore, and create in ways they wouldn’t be able to if they had endless piles of toys and empty space.

I’m curious how this looks in your lives, fellow mamas! Do you ever struggle to encourage your kids to play creatively or does it seem to come naturally?


*Thank you to Do Good Shop for sponsoring this post and gifting my girls with a few of their very favorite toys. Do Good Shop is a long-term partner of SL&Co. and is doing incredible work to provide fair wage and safe jobs for artisans around the world.

Use the code SIMPLYLIVANDCO for 20% off your purchase.*

How to encourage your kids to play MORE with LESS -- Lessons from a family of five living tiny.

Simply Styled || A Postpartum Pep Talk

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I shared on Instagram a few days ago that I’m learning (slowly and with lots of patience) to put clothes on a body that feels a bit foreign to me. I know the postpartum phase is fleeting, and eventually I’ll “have my body back”, but for now, in the immediate weeks and months following pregnancy and childbirth, things just feel a little abnormal.

I’m getting to know a new soft, squishy tummy where there was recently a hard, round belly, and before that, something relatively flat and fit. My thighs touch where they didn’t before, my hips are wider, my skin reacts differently to things it used to love, even my feet seem to have shifted just enough to cause a noticeable difference in the fit of my favorite shoes.

Pregnancy is beautiful and I’m loving the postpartum phase more now than ever before, but sometimes, dressing a body that doesn’t feel like home yet is strange.

Whether you’ve had a baby or not, chances are women of all ages and lifestyles can relate to the feeling. Period bloat, stressful seasons, a new relationship, a job change, a sickness or new diet — all of these things can affect our bodies in ways we never expected, causing us to embark on a new journey of getting to know ourselves in our present state and push towards health as we are now.

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It’s tempting to want to rush to the “get my body back” part of this. It’s tempting to want to try on my old high wasited summer mom jeans that fit a mere 12 months ago. It’s tempting to compare my postpartum body to someone further down the “recovery line”. But this time, the third time, I’m finally content. I’ve found more peace with my present body and have thanked it for not only sustaining me but for growing and sustaining my little Aria.

But there’s a learning curve nonetheless.

I’m leaning hard on wrap silhouettes these days. This top, the Simone Top from Pamut, has been on rotation lately for it’s versatile shape (it can be worn tucked in or out, or reversed) and easy access for breastfeeding (which is just about all I have time to do these days). It’s made of organic cotton gauze and is especially light and airy for the summer months (and for postpartum hormones).

One of my favorite things about this brand is the fact that, although their size chart already goes from a 00-16, they’ll make any customer a piece to fit their body if their measurements aren’t on the size chart. Size inclusivity is something particularly important to me, in addition to sustainable fabrics and ethical production (all of which Pamut achieves beautifully).

Shamless plug for this wonderful brand: if you’re in the market for some extremely high quality pieces that can be easily dressed up or down, use the code “simplyliv” for 20% off an order from Pamut (not an affiliate link, I just love it when you can save money on great clothes).

I paired the Simone Top with my trusty Aurorei linen pants — the pair I had been fantasizing about my entire pregnancy because I missed wearing them so much — and my Nisolo Ama mules.

The outfit looks more elevated than many a cozy-loving-mama’s go to of leggings and tee, but trust me, it's even more comfortable, breathable, and practical. It’s also great for the “getting to know you” phase of my body’s recovery. The silhouette is loose but feminine and it gives me lots of room to breathe and accept.

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I hope to share more of these “simply styled” posts and give raw, truthful peeks into my postpartum journey and what that looks like for not only my closet, but for my mental health as well.

What about you? Can you relate to the sentiment of not fully knowing your own body for a time? How have you given yourself grace to grow through those seasons?


Thank you to Pamut Apparel for sponsoring this post — as always, all photos, creative direction, and opinions are my own. Use the code “simplyliv” for 20% off any order at checkout!

Sari Bari || The Diaper Bag with a Story to Tell

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The theme of “new life” is an easy one to trace in my life lately. My home is currently full of newness — a new life in the literal sense after Aria joined us, a fresh “rebirth” for me as a mother of three, a new life for my older two as they navigate the world of older-sisterhood, a new path for AJ and I to forge together as a family of five.

There’s another form of “newness” too, woven into our lifestyle that, although different than the fresh start we have currently, is made even more impactful when compared with the newness around me now.

A piece that I use everyday — something every mother needs and uses — was sewn by a woman who was given a new life of her own; pulled out of the horrors of Kolkata’s red light district.

Sari Bari, a brand I’ve followed and admired for several years, has created a safe haven to empower women rescued from the expansive sex trafficking industry in Kolkata. They train these women with a marketable skill (sewing), give them a safe place to live, work, and recover, and provide them with post-trafficking treatment to ensure their new life is met with hope and true health.

Each bag, blanket, and pillow that Sari Bari sells was made by a woman who is, in the most literal sense, creating a new life for herself and her family. It’s the most glaring contrast of darkness and hope, being trapped and experiencing freedom.

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And I’ve decided to use this piece, something so meaningful and beautiful, in the most menial way: as a bag to carry spare diapers, swaddles, and snacks. It seems almost like a step down for the work of art that it is, but perhaps that’s what gives Sari Bari’s pieces their final mark of beauty. The maker’s themselves are given a chance at real, true, beautiful, messy life — and then we, the ones who buy and use their handiwork, give their pieces a new life of their own, likely one that’s just as real, true, beautiful, and messy. To carry dirty diapers and containers of cheerios is a noble task in itself.

Sure, a diaper bag can be any shape/style and from just about any retailer, but I’m a firm believer that if there’s a way to support a greater cause with even the most practical of purchases, you should do it. Give new life with your diaper bags, support the freedom of someone else when you buy new clothes, spend your dollars where they’ll be put to good use.

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The Process

Each piece from Sari Bari is made from vintage, upcycled saris (another piece of the “new life” metaphor that I clearly can’t get enough of). The artisans use a technique called Kantha to handsew five layers of sari together, giving the piece true uniqueness and quality. In true Kantha tradition, each piece is signed by the maker as a finishing mark, as if the seamstress is leaving the mark of her freed, empowered life in each piece she makes.

The Partnership

In addition to job training, Sari Bari also provides “wholelife care”, leadership training, school support for their children, well woman checkups, and HIV/aids treatment and care. (To partner with Sari Bari and support their artisans in one of these ways, click here). This partnership allows the team and staff at Sari Bari to truly help these women start over and build a new life.

The Products

Using techniques passed down for generations, the women at Sari Bari use traditional patterns to create modern pieces like bags, backpacks, bed and table linens, baby blankets and more.

Click here to shop their collection!

Use the code “SIMPLYLIV” for 20% off

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The fact that something as simple as a new diaper bag to make my life easier (it converts to a crossbody too, for even more versatility!), has such a powerful story behind it is almost more than I can wrap my mind around.

If you’re on the hunt for a new wallet, purse, bag for travel, or even a new bed spread or baby shower gift for a friend, consider shopping with this incredible brand that does so much more than just create gorgeously unique products.

And when you do, don’t forget to use SIMPLYLIV for 20% off (not an affiliate link, I just want you to save money while shopping for good). ;)


*This post was sponsored by Sari Bari. As always, all words, photos, and creative direction are my own. Thank you for supporting these amazing brands!*