Sourcery the Label || Luxury Simplified

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Motherhood isn’t a luxurious business.

It’s messy and sleepy and, usually, a general blur. It’s taken me three kids to somewhat get my feet under me and still, there are days where it’s all I can do to pull on a pair of leggings and do the dishes. Between the spit up stains, crayon markings, and spilled dinners, I need a wardrobe that can keep up with my messy reality.

When most people think of silk — the worm-grown fabric that’s been craved for centuries around the world — the words “practical” or “day to day” don’t usually come to mind. In fact, the fabric usually conjures up the opposite. Words like “luxury” and “excess” typically spring to mind.

Buy why, I ask, can’t we demand both? Can “practical luxury” be a reality too?

Motherhood (or any other lifestyle) doesn’t have a one-size-fits all aesthetic (or fabric) and our wardrobes shouldn’t either. Sourcery is one label on a mission to mix practicality and luxury with their machine washable silk garments.

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The Fabric

Yep. It’s Machine washable. Aside from the environmental and health issues associated with most dry-cleaners, the majority of us don’t have time to drop our clothes off somewhere else to be washed. That’s the kind of excess and “luxury” that most silk garments demand, until now.

Sourcery creates all of their pieces from silk that can be washed at home, free from the risk of carcinogens and other toxins at the dry-cleaners. The fabric is incredibly light-weight and soft, but durable. It doesn’t stain easily, like other silks I’ve worn and, if something happens, you can toss it in the washing machine on cold and wash with the rest of your clothes.

The Factory

Sourcery is incredibly transparent about where they source their silk and where it’s dyed and spun into fabric. Their raw silk is sourced from a supplier located where silk production originated 5,000 years ago. The fabric is dyed using Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certification, which means it’s free of most chemicals present in most dye-houses.

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I know the price tag may seem intimidating to those of us who shop with “practicality” in mind, but hear me out. The durability and quality of this fabric means it will last for years. Whereas a cheaper fabric — one sewn in questionable factories using questionable ethics and cheap fabrics — will likely deteriorate over several wears or require expensive dry cleaning under the guise of false expense. Sourcery’s washable silk, on the other hand, will last for years with proper care (which luckily means just machine washing it). The wear/cost breakdown makes Sourcery’s pieces far more sustainable AND cost-effective in the long run.

The Wide Leg Silk Crop pants pair well with dressier button down tops for work wear or they can be worn day-to-day, perfect for this work from home mama, with a simple tee or crop top, like my go-to ones shown here from ROUND + SQUARE. I’m excited to layer my denim jacket over the top and add my favorite booties as the weather begins the cool.

One thing I’ve learned in my (almost) six years of motherhood is that when I feel like I’ve put effort into myself, be it my outfit, some extra rest, time to pursue a passion, or anything else, I’m all the more equipped to be the kind of mother my kids deserve.

Sourcery enables me to run and chase and meal plan and baby-wear and mother while feeling like I haven’t lost any bits of my identity along the way. Practical luxury at it’s very finest.

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*This post was sponsored by Sourcery Label. All opinions, photos, and creative direction are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make this blog possible!*

Simply Styled || A Postpartum Pep Talk

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I shared on Instagram a few days ago that I’m learning (slowly and with lots of patience) to put clothes on a body that feels a bit foreign to me. I know the postpartum phase is fleeting, and eventually I’ll “have my body back”, but for now, in the immediate weeks and months following pregnancy and childbirth, things just feel a little abnormal.

I’m getting to know a new soft, squishy tummy where there was recently a hard, round belly, and before that, something relatively flat and fit. My thighs touch where they didn’t before, my hips are wider, my skin reacts differently to things it used to love, even my feet seem to have shifted just enough to cause a noticeable difference in the fit of my favorite shoes.

Pregnancy is beautiful and I’m loving the postpartum phase more now than ever before, but sometimes, dressing a body that doesn’t feel like home yet is strange.

Whether you’ve had a baby or not, chances are women of all ages and lifestyles can relate to the feeling. Period bloat, stressful seasons, a new relationship, a job change, a sickness or new diet — all of these things can affect our bodies in ways we never expected, causing us to embark on a new journey of getting to know ourselves in our present state and push towards health as we are now.

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It’s tempting to want to rush to the “get my body back” part of this. It’s tempting to want to try on my old high wasited summer mom jeans that fit a mere 12 months ago. It’s tempting to compare my postpartum body to someone further down the “recovery line”. But this time, the third time, I’m finally content. I’ve found more peace with my present body and have thanked it for not only sustaining me but for growing and sustaining my little Aria.

But there’s a learning curve nonetheless.

I’m leaning hard on wrap silhouettes these days. This top, the Simone Top from Pamut, has been on rotation lately for it’s versatile shape (it can be worn tucked in or out, or reversed) and easy access for breastfeeding (which is just about all I have time to do these days). It’s made of organic cotton gauze and is especially light and airy for the summer months (and for postpartum hormones).

One of my favorite things about this brand is the fact that, although their size chart already goes from a 00-16, they’ll make any customer a piece to fit their body if their measurements aren’t on the size chart. Size inclusivity is something particularly important to me, in addition to sustainable fabrics and ethical production (all of which Pamut achieves beautifully).

Shamless plug for this wonderful brand: if you’re in the market for some extremely high quality pieces that can be easily dressed up or down, use the code “simplyliv” for 20% off an order from Pamut (not an affiliate link, I just love it when you can save money on great clothes).

I paired the Simone Top with my trusty Aurorei linen pants — the pair I had been fantasizing about my entire pregnancy because I missed wearing them so much — and my Nisolo Ama mules.

The outfit looks more elevated than many a cozy-loving-mama’s go to of leggings and tee, but trust me, it's even more comfortable, breathable, and practical. It’s also great for the “getting to know you” phase of my body’s recovery. The silhouette is loose but feminine and it gives me lots of room to breathe and accept.

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I hope to share more of these “simply styled” posts and give raw, truthful peeks into my postpartum journey and what that looks like for not only my closet, but for my mental health as well.

What about you? Can you relate to the sentiment of not fully knowing your own body for a time? How have you given yourself grace to grow through those seasons?


Thank you to Pamut Apparel for sponsoring this post — as always, all photos, creative direction, and opinions are my own. Use the code “simplyliv” for 20% off any order at checkout!

Jackalo || Strong Enough for Kids, Gentle on the Planet

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Ah, children’s clothes. Although the vast majority of my kids’ clothing is secondhand or hand-me-downs, on the rare occasion that we buy a new piece for our girls, it usually lasts about as long as it takes for them to outgrow it or for them to rip a hole in it. Children’s apparel isn’t designed to last, because at the rate kids grow, why would it be? When you’re continually having to size up, wash away the ketchup stains, patch ripped knees, and wish for better options, it’s no wonder that shopping sustainably for your kids (at least for me) is one of the first things to go.

Aside from there being shockingly few options for ethically made kids clothes, when I have come across brands in the past I have a hard time justifying the price tag for the amount of wears my kids will get out of the item. If a piece lasts only one season before E & M outgrow or destroy it, what’s the point?

Luckily, "hard to find” doesn’t mean impossible and today’s brand goes above and beyond in terms of sustainability AND practicality for kids.

Marianna, the owner, designer, one-woman-show behind Jackalo, knows a thing or two about the struggle most parents face while looking for clothes that will last for children. A mother of two herself, she grew frustrated with the lack of sustainable options that wouldn’t cost her an arm and a leg, especially since her sons would play their way through each pair in no time.

She decided to take matters into her own hands and design a kid’s pant that could withstand normal rough and tumble and check all of the boxes in the sustainability field. Thus, Jackalo was born.

Their pants, the brand’s first product along with a coverall, are made from organic, fair trade cotton. The knees are doubled with a reinforced layer, to make them extra durable and rip free. To sweeten the deal, each pair comes in gender neutral colors and is able to be rolled up to save a bit of length until your child grows into them.

In this post, Evie is wearing the Ash Lined Engineer Stripe pant (paired with leopard print, of course) and Mara is wearing the Jax Berry pant, both in size 4 (they’re 3 and 5 but roughly the same size, so I went in the middle).

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Circular Consumerism

One of my favorite things about Jackalo is their Trade Up program. Marianna knows how quickly kids grow and even though her pants are meant to accommodate a wider range than most, her Trade Up program takes over when time has done it’s work and the pants no longer fit. They will take back any Jackalo pant, to repair and resell at a discount, and give you a 20% discount towards your next pair. It keeps their pants out of landfill and ensures that each pair is truly getting the maximum wear.

Jackalo is refreshingly transparent about where and how their organic cotton is grown, and even share links for customers to learn more about the milling, weaving, and assembly process.

In my chats with Marianna (I also work with her on a freelance basis, so I’ve gotten a more in-depth look into her brand than most), she’s mentioned how much of a labor of love growing Jackalo has been. Sourcing organic and fair trade materials isn’t the convenient route by any means, and neither is accepting old product back for resale, but she’s so committed to bettering the world (and our children’s quality of play) through her pieces that each extra step is worth it.

Keep an eye out for new pieces from Jackalo soon — they’re truly doing their part to create conscious and practical clothes for kids who play hard.


*This piece was sponsored by Jackalo — thank you for supporting the brands that make SL&Co. possible.*

Zanni || Dresses for Whatever

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When it comes to versatility and timelessness, I can't think of any pieces that fit the bill better than the "LBD". A classic in it's own right, black dresses transcend seasons, events, life-phases, and can even accommodate changing bodies (hello pregnancy, or you know, period week). They can range from sultry and strappy to loose, modest and flowy, but if you've peeked inside my closet anytime in the past three years, you'll know that the t-shirt dress silhouette is my favorite for the LBD. 

Although until now, I've only owned one LBD. My trusty Sotela shift dress that I bought long before I ever partnered with the brand. The material of that dress, tencel, while great for dressing up and everyday wear, isn't stretchy or sweat resistant. These two qualities aren't typically on my radar when I choose a new piece for my closet, however, now that I've tried Zanni's "dresses for whatever", I'm hooked on a new kind of versatility that I don't usually consider. 

Zanni designs their dresses for quite literally anything. Made from a stretchy, workout apparel-like fabric, these dresses are meant to take you from a bike commute, to a meeting, to a post-work coffee date. Frustrated with the lack of "low maintenance" pieces in her closet, Zanni founder, Suzanne Brosnan, wanted to find a way to celebrate her love for comfort without sacrificing style or timelessness. So, she combined the two in the most dreamy way - stretchy, athletic-esque material with classic LBD designs that can take you just about anywhere. 

The Fabric

Sourced from an ethical and vetted fabric mill in Italy, Zanni's dresses are made with a blend of cotton, Polyamide, and elastane, giving them incredible stretch and softness. The fabric is UV ray resistant and waterproof to boot. 

I put it to the ultimate test by wearing my Zanni Wear on Repeat dress on a plane ride and, subsequently, several days in the humidity and heat of Omaha, Nebraska. No matter how hot I was, the dress never felt wet and actually did a better job of keeping me cool than anything else I packed for the trip. 

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Suzanne has designed a wide range of dresses, including a maxi dress, a classic A-line, a tank dress, and more. The material is flattering, clinging where you want it to and falling away from where you don't. I've worn mine alone with sneakers, dressed up with flats and a statement necklace, or casually with my Tradlands denim jacket and Sseko slides.   

As someone who generally steers clear of "athleisure" fabrics for my day to day life (you'll rarely see me in leggings unless I'm doing yoga, going to bed, or having a really off day), I'm genuinely in love with the ease and low-maintenance feel of this dress. Although I love getting dressed, I appreciate any brand that helps me achieve a no-fuss, simple yet classy look and Zanni does it all with ease. These truly are dresses for whatever. 

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*This post was sponsored by Zanni LA. All photography, opinions, and words are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that keep this blog alive.**