How to Wash Cloth Diapers || with GlowBug Diapers

You may have seen my video on Instagram from last week where I shared my “washing routine” for Aria’s diapers. I thought writing up a blog post on the same topic would be helpful for those of us who’d prefer to see it all spelled out rather than sit through the video.

To catch my first FAQ post on cloth diapering click here.

Before I started cloth diapering Aria, my biggest hesitation (and still the most frequently asked question I get) was about washing dirty diapers and then reusing them….I’m used to the convenience of disposables and switching to cloth mostly required a mindset shift. I wasn’t sure how clean the diapers would actually be, but I figured I’d give it a shot since it obviously worked for every single mom in history until the advent of the disposable alternative.

So I jumped in. And guess what? it’s SO MUCH LESS DISGUSTING THAN I EXPECTED. Sure, diapering isn’t really a blast no matter what method you use and I’ll report back to you once we introduce solids in a few months. But for now, washing the diapers has been a breeze.

Using cloth diapers can seem intimidating at first, but once you jump in, you'll find that it's so much simpler than you expected. Washing is the trickiest part: here's a simple routine to follow.

Here’s the routine I’ve found that works for me:

Step 1: Determine how frequently you’ll need to wash

Since we don’t have a washer/dryer in our RV, I have to plan my laundry days more than most. But even with a washer/dryer in your home, you won’t want to be washing diapers every day. I’ve found the sweet spot is about every 3 days (this means you’ll need about 25-30 diapers to go this long between washes). I usually wash once on the weekend and once in the middle of the week…if it’s a major diaper week sometimes I’ll add in a third day or wash some of the diapers to give me some more time.

Step 2: Decide where/how you’ll store the dirties

Again, since our space is limited, I store all of the dirty diapers in Glow Bug Cloth Diapers’ wet bags. They’re made of the same material as the diaper covers, so they’re water (or rather, pee) proof, and don’t let out the smell of the diapers much. I have 5-6 wet bags total and keep one in the car, one in my bag, and the rest in our room to stick dirties at home.

For people with more space, a diaper pail or something along those lines will work just as well.

See? look how happy I am about laundry day.

See? look how happy I am about laundry day.

Step 3: Separate the diapers

When it’s time to wash, I always separate the insert from the cover. This is an extra step and you don’t necessarily need to do it (you can totally just dump them in and wash) but I’ve found that it gets them even more clean when I separate them.

Step 4: Pre-Rinse

If you have time, a HOT pre-rinse without any detergent works wonders for getting the smell out and getting your diapers extra clean.

Step 5: Wash

I wash everything on hot/heavy duty/extra rinse. If you have an HE washer, it should conserve water and wash in a timely manner. When it comes to water useage, I can promise you that cloth diapers use WAY less water than disposables do in production.

Step 6: Dry

Although most diapers are dryer-friendly, I try to air dry them as much as possible. Sunlight works WONDERS for baby poop stains, so if there is a stain on an insert, letting it dry in the sun usually does the trick.

If I need diapers ASAP, I’ll toss them in the dryer on light heat and they’ll be dry super quickly.


That’s it! Like I said before, it has been so much easier than expected and to any new-to-cloth-mama’s, I’ll tell you what everyone else told me before I started: It just takes a few weeks of trial and error to find out what works for you. Once you do though, it’s the most natural thing in the world.

Any questions? I’d love to help out if I can!


*This post is part of a long term collaboration with Glow Bug Cloth Diapers. As always, all opinions/photos/thoughts on dirty laundry are my own. Thanks for supporting the brands who make the world a little more green.*

Made Trade || Beautifully Curated, Ethically Created

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Home is where a life is made, memories are spun, and hopefully, the happiest moments occur. It’s where you’ll wake up with your baby hundreds of times over dozens of sleepy nights, it’s where you’ll run to get drinks of water for littles who just can’t seem to fall asleep. It’s where you’ll bicker with your spouse and share apologies over your favorite cocktail. It’s where you’ll redecorate and rearrange and reconsider. It’s where you should feel most comfortable.

The concept of “home” is one that I’ve written about a lot and one of the notions that is most important to me. I love creating spaces that feel like home, be it an RV, an imperfect condo, a bedroom in my parents house, or now, my most recent venture, a tiny coffee shop in an unsuspecting mountain town.

Home, although it’s so much more than the pieces that fill it, like your wardrobe, is something that should be made up of pieces that were made with love, dignity, fairness, and creativity. There’s a dark side to every industry and home goods are just as guilty as any other when it comes to mass production, unfair wages, and cheaply made products that are harmful to the makers and the environment. So, when it’s possible, I try to fill my spaces that I call home with goods that were made as beautifully and fairly as the space I’m trying to curate.

Made Trade is a new favorite resource for doing just that, taking the guess work out of creating an “ethical home”.

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If you read my blog post from last week, you’ll know that deciphering the ethics of most brands can get pretty “murky”. That’s why when a brand like Made Trade pops on the scene I LOVE sharing about what they do. They share exactly where their pieces are made, who makes them, what materials are used, and whether the artisan was paid a fair wage to do so.

Made Trade’s core values are Sustainability, Heritage, Fair Trade, Vegan and when possible, USA Made. This means that they’re committed to sourcing products that not only have minimal environmental impact but are made fairly, without the use of animal products, and either support a local USA cooperative or craft or preserve a cultural heritage through artisan craft. They lay it out clearly, concisely, without greenwashing or using buzz words to catch attention.

We call it being “ethically elevated.” It means we put artistry above efficiency. Fair wages above profits. Sustainability above mass production. Quality craftsmanship above mindless consumption. And transparency above everything, as we painstakingly hand-select only the most artfully-designed, ethically-made goods that put people and our planet first.

— Made Trade

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That, to me, is what an ethical home should look like as well.

For this collaboration, I drifted away from my typical “drinkware of choice” (a coffee mug) and opted for something AJ and I can enjoy together. These copper cups are handmade by Sertodo Copper, an initiative making gorgeous cooper homegoods in Texas and Mexico for more than 20 years. The craft though, has been passed down for more than 1000 years and is a source of both art, creativity, and income for the artisans who create it.

The cups are made using recycled copper, meant to last for generations much like the craft itself.

My go-to cocktail is a Moscow Mule, which is heightened by the copper, making this cup an easy sell for me, but it also works just as well for those middle of the night water runs to squelch bad dreams or parched throats.

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The beauty of Made Trade, much like a home, is that it’s a beautifully curated “hodgepodge” of goods. All of them chosen for it’s fairness, beauty, and usefulness. They have everything from clothing (with pieces from some of my all-time favorite brands), to furniture and lighting, to smaller pieces of decor for your home. There’s something for all homes, bodies, and budgets on Made Trade and that’s certainly something worth toasting to.

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*This post was sponsored by Made Trade, but as always, all photos, creative direction, and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that are making the world a better place.*

The Spectrum of Clutter || Why Having Too Much "Stuff" isn't Always the Problem

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A few weeks ago, I asked my Instagram followers which “type” of clutter most weighed them down. The answers were, as you’d expect, all over the board, with most saying that physical clutter distracted them the most. But regardless of which type bogged an individual down more, one thing stood out to me as I read the comments of the photo.

Not one person said they felt like clutter didn’t affect them.

No one said that they had all aspects of their lives squared away and didn’t struggle with at least one area.

This struck me because, despite our obsession with Kon Mari-ing everything, downsizing, and ensuring our wardrobes are neatly edited and capsuled, it’s still not enough. We still feel stressed. We still feel overwhelmed…sometimes (for me at least) it’s an overall feeling of overwhelm that I can’t peg on anything in particular.

These moments of “general overwhelm”, I’ve learned, usually boil down to an excess in one of the following areas that I haven’t recognized until it’s too late.

Sure, we can’t weed out every aspect of stress or “extra” from our lives, but we can do our best to recognize when we’re doing too much, owning too much, or taking on too much and learn when to cut back. It’s been one of the healthiest mental exercises I’ve started doing for myself, and I hope that once you’ve become more aware of which area of clutter stresses you the most, it will do the same for you too. Learning to think of clutter in a broader sense can be much more helpful than you’d realize.

I’d love to hear which clutter-style you most relate to in the comments below ;)

*Disclaimer, I don’t claim to be an expert in any of these areas, nor am I a psychologist. The following areas are simply describing things I’ve noticed both in my own life and in the lives of those I love.

  1. Physical Clutter

The first “pillar of clutter” gets the worst rap of them all, likely because it’s the most visible and the most publicized. Physical clutter is out in the open, for you (and everyone who enters your home) to see. Our possessions are a reflection of what we value, so of course, they’re the first thing that gets attention when we get stressed or in need of a detox.

For some, myself included, untidiness is a major area of stress. I usually feel like I can’t sit down to write or be creative unless my space is at least a little bit cleaned up and I have a cup of coffee in hand. I’m drawn to aesthetics, so I like my space to reflect the kind of creativity I’m trying to conjure up. That’s likely why I was so drawn to minimalism after becoming a mom — it felt like the only way I could regain a sense of control and identity. Lots of you said the same thing on Instagram. You feel like you have too much stuff, too many clothes, too many unnecessary “junk drawers”.

Clearing out this clutter is a great and important step towards feeling more free, but it only scratches the surface.

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2. Mental Clutter

It usually takes a bit of a “self-discovery” journey to figure out whether mental clutter weighs you down or if you’re able to stay more or less “on task” when it comes to your thoughts. Through learning more about myself via the Enneagram, I’ve learned that as a type 9, I have an exceptionally hard time learning which tasks to prioritize. This often leads to a brain fog where I’m aware of everything I need to do, but can’t quite nail down which item needs checked off first. Usually, I end up doing something less important (scrolling Instagram or picking up after the girls for the thousandth time) instead of doing the more intimidating but important things first.

Mental clutter can look different for everyone though. Some people are able to mentally keep track of everything (Type 1’s i’m looking at you), but for others, it’s really their mental clutter that weighs them down more than anything else.

3. Calendar Clutter

Oh, the glorification of staying busy. We get bored, so we schedule more. All too often, we subconsciously assign ourselves value through how many playdates, or meetings, or business calls we schedule for a particular week. How much we do, or achieve, instead of who we are. Having things to do somehow makes us feel more important/valuable/validated.

I wrote a few years ago about this “glorification”, making the case that being busy isn’t better. In this post, I break down a list of “why’s” for doing something — for example, I sometimes sign up for something because I think it will make someone else happy, instead of doing it because I want to do it.

I try to use the same “spark joy” mentality that I use for the belongings I keep when it comes to the way I schedule my time.

4. Emotional Clutter

Physical clutter gets a bad rap, but it only scratches the surface when it comes to other types of clutter than can weigh you down. Which type do you relate to most?

For those who feel before analyzing (feelers vs. thinkers), emotional clutter can be debilitating. Oftentimes, this boils down to drama with family or friends or stressing over an important decision and being unable to prioritize anything else.

In cases like these, it’s so important to recognize which relationships are an added weight to your life without adding joy or edification. Of course, some relationships we can’t cut out fully, but there are most certainly times when saying goodbye to a toxic or unhealthy relationship is just the thing to help your mind heal and de-clutter.


Clutter, being the buzz word that it is, can be tricky to nail down. Clearing your life from clutter completely isn’t necessarily possible (or healthy), but being aware of your clutter stressors can help you live life more fully and simply.

Tiny Living || Reducing Waste in Our Kitchen

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Since the beginning of my #InspiringZeroWaste challenge in January, I’ve hesitated to tackle one of the biggest areas that my household (and most households, I think) creates waste.

The kitchen.

Smaller space, as I’ve learned, doesn’t mean less waste and sometimes, it can mean producing even more waste for the sake of convenience.

This post won’t portray me as a perfect zero-waster, because the reality is that, especially in the kitchen, I’m far from it. But I’m working on implementing small steps (that I can actually stick with) thanks to this monthly challenge.

Today, I’m excited to share a bit of what I’ve already done to decrease waste in my kitchen — in this post, I’m welcoming the help of Do Good Shop (although you don’t need to buy anything to lessen your waste!). I’ll also share a few goals that I have for the coming month(s) and hopefully spark a bit of inspiration on your end as well.

If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop for ethical home goods, Do Good Shop is a great resource. They’re a non-profit marketplace stocking items that support artisans, end trafficking, and encourage traditional craftsmanship. You’ll be hearing lots more about them in the coming months.

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In my “waste audit” of my tiny kitchen, I learned that packaging and food waste are the two biggest areas my family and I create waste. Although I’m not sure we will ever fully eliminate packaging from our home (packing school lunches without single-wrapped foods is HARD) and I may never find the perfect balance of buying and cooking the perfect amount of food, I’ve found a few ways to consciously reduce waste in these areas that have helped tremendously.

We still produce far too much trash than I’m comfortable with, even for a small family, and I would ideally like to recycle even less than we do (consuming less in general) but reducing waste as a family isn’t easy and I’m choosing to celebrate each small step instead of beat myself up for the long ways I have left to go.

Here are a few ways I’ve gotten started that you can try too:

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  1. DIY as much as you can

    DIY-ing, as much as my aesthetics-loving self hates to admit it, doesn’t have to be pretty. First and foremost, it should solve a problem or expense in your life, ultimately saving you time and money. I’ve fallen in love with DIY-ing my own cleaning supplies which saves my home from unnecessary plastic packaging and the unnecessary toxins found in most cleaning supplies. I also DIY things like tupperware, meaning I’ll reuse packaging certain foods come in to save other food before eventually recycling it. Things like cheese cartons, or even the twist ties found in the produce section can be used in other ways.

  2. Swap cloth for disposables

    It can be a beautifully-made swap, like my cloth napkins from Do Good Shop made by artisans in India using time-honored block printing, or it can be as simple as a cut up old t-shirt to use as cleaning rags. I have (and use) both daily. While my tee-cloths are essential for cleaning the daily messes, I wouldn’t use them to serve as dinner napkins or even something to clean up crumbs or coffee grounds. With these two “products” I’ve eliminated paper towels and other disposable cleaning wipes from my home.

  3. Shop seasonally and avoid plastic where you can

    I won’t even pretend that shopping zero-waste for groceries for a family of almost five is easy, because it isn’t. We have limited access to farmers’ markets and bulk food stores, so I’m usually left with shopping from the organic produce section and crossing my fingers that I remembered my reusable shopping bags. BUT it’s do-able to make a dent in your packaging and plastic intake and it’s worth trying, even if you can’t do it perfectly.

  4. Use your food scraps

    It’s hard to plan how long your food will last and, similarly, how much of it your three and five year old will eat once you make it, but there are ways to reduce your food waste by cooking with unused food scraps and strategically cooking/shopping to reduce extras. I learned about some great ways to use food waste from Going Zero Waste and her newly released book, but you can also do a quick Google search to find lots of inspiration. There are also lots of foods you can regrow from the stems and bottoms, so I’ve been experimenting a lot with that lately too.

  5. Meal Plan

    I’m the worst at meal planning. The absolute worst. In my almost six years of marriage and 5 years of motherhood, I haven’t consistently stuck with it until this year, when I realized how much of a money and sanity saver it really is. Meal planning, it turns out, can significantly reduce your waste in the kitchen too.

Not a super glamorous list, I know, or even what you may have expected (a list full of products you need to buy and eco-switches you need to make). Although products can be helpful for convenience and keeping you motivated, I’ve learned that reducing waste is really a mindset (and ultimately a lifestyle) shift, especially in the kitchen.

I love keeping a few "pretty things” around to keep things cheery and bright, like my Olivewood Serving Tray from Do Good Shop that serves as an in-bed tray, a plant display, a snack server and so much more, and a few pretty napkins and hand towels. But other than that, the kitchen is a place to make messes and get creative, and reducing your waste in the kitchen may not be as pretty as you’d expect either.

My #InspiringZeroWaste goal for this month is to research small space composting! I’d LOVE any resources you know of or tips that have worked well for you. I’m not opposed to an outdoor composting bin (in fact, I’d prefer it) but it needs to be bear and wildlife proof! (#mountainliving).

How hard has reducing waste in the kitchen been in your life? I’d love to hear your tips!


*This post is part of a long term collaboration with Do Good Shop. But all opinions, creative direction, and photographs are my own. Shop the links in this post to support brands that create a better world for artisans all over the world!*

Kitchens are one of the most wasteful areas of most rooms, but you might be surprised at how simple it is to start reducing your trash, even with kids in the house.

Turkish Textiles || Quiquattro

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The longer I work with brands and write about their products, the more fascinated by textiles I become. I find the process from plant to thread to fabric so fascinating and, when done ethically and sustainably, something to be truly celebrated and supported. There are so many ways to “spin it” when it comes to fabric creation, but hand-woven pieces made from natural fibers have to be some of the most heirloom-worthy.

In my pre-slow fashion days, I would run to Target or H&M or *Insert-big-chain-fast-fashion-store-of-choice-here* when I needed something like a blanket or a towel (in fact, my freshman year of college, I literally had one orange towel that I bought from Target). And although I was thrifty, my purchases reflected their true worth. They’d unravel after a few uses, pill after a few washes, or dull in color after a bit of wear and tear.

I’ve been in seasons of life when it’s financially necessary to choose the cheaply made option and, without a doubt, recognize the privilege involved in being able to choose better made alternatives, but let me tell you — the difference between supporting handmade versus unnamed-factory-somewhere-made is palpable.

There’s something about cozying up with a blanket or drying off with a towel knowing that the hands who made it were treated fairly, paid well, and were supported through its creation.

Quiquattro is one such brand who takes the “weaver to customer” mentality seriously.

Their products — a beautiful collection of pestemal towels, bedspreads and beachwear — are all handloomed by women weavers in Turkey using bamboo and cotton. The result? Gorgeously intricate detail and a textile that can withstand day to day use and washing.

I packed the Stone beach towel in my suitcase on our babymoon to Cancun because I loved how beautiful the towel was and couldn’t pass up an excuse to put it to use (no surprise that Colorado winters don’t allow for many beach days). It doubled as a cover up, beach blanket, and towel and was just absorbent enough to keep me dry without becoming too wet. It’s woven with stunning detail, but is still sturdy enough to act as a true towel.

And because my girls are over the moon when they get special surprises in the mail too, the sweet folks at Quiquattro sent over two matching bathrobes to keep them cozy and dry. We use them after showers, at the pool, and most recently, on a family morning trip to our local hot springs.

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We’ve also been loving their Navy Blue Bed Cover and have had it for four or five months now. It’s surprisingly heavy, intricately made, and very high quality. We put it on top of our duvet cover and it’s been the perfect thing to keep in the heat all winter long.

Although running to the closest fast fashion store is undoubtedly the more convenient and instantly gratifying option, choosing to support brands like QuiQuattro to furnish your bedroom and bathroom means that women artisans are able to make a living for themselves, sustainable craftsmanship is pushed forward, and you’re left with a piece that will last you years and years, instead of only a few rounds through the washer and dryer.


*This post was in partnership with QuiQuattro. All opinions, photographs, and creative direction are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make SL&Co. possible!*